You are not logged in.

Announcement

Welcome to the Occupational Therapy International Online Network (OTION).

Our goal is to provide an online resource for the international occupational therapy community through this on-line forum.

You will have the opportunity to participate in discussion topics related to your practice area and interact with your international colleagues. A moderator, who will be a resource to the group, monitors each topic.

We look forward to your participation and contribution to international occupational therapy practice.

If you are new, please click here to register. If you have already registered, click here to login.


#1 Friday 28th of October 2016 14:33

pgvmartinez
Member

OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Across different cultures, there are several occupations that we do in several different ways.
For example, in the simple occupation of eating/feeding: different cultures use different utensils and maybe even engage at eating on different periods of the day.

Share a unique way how your community/culture engage in certain occupations!
You can post images/video links for a more vivid illustration of your interesting story.


Thank you!

Offline

#2 Sunday 30th of October 2016 15:58

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Filipinos put a high value on cleanliness that taking a bath at least once or twice every day has been such an important part of everyday life. This habit may be attributed to the hot and humid climate in our country and the abundance of water seeing as we are surrounded by large bodies of water. We usually take a bath in the morning before leaving for work and one again in the evening before going to sleep. For some Filipinos who claim to only take a bath once a day, chances are they take what we call a “half bath” which involves cleaning the face, armpits, private parts and feet before sleeping.

5a5rmx.jpgg
                                                                                  The Philippines' famous tabo and timba

Unlike other countries, many Filipino households do not have overhead showers that is why the plastic tabo, pronounced as TAH-boh is an almost indispensable fixture in the Filipino home. Although it is most commonly found in the provinces, it is also widely used in the cities. The tabo and the timba, generally a plastic pail with a metal handle filled with water are the traditional Filipino hygiene tools used to clean the toilet floor, to get water to flush the toilet, and most importantly, to get water for personal cleanliness: for washing hands, for shampooing, and for bathing the whole body.

Also, not all toilets in the Philippines have a flush, so the tabo and the timba are also widely used for anal cleansing. Many Filipinos actually prefer this practice rather than using toilet paper since believe it or not, it will make you feel much cleaner and refreshed than using toilet paper alone. Worry not since Filipinos thoroughly wash their hands after going to the toilet using water and soap.

Click the YouTube link below if you want to learn more about the unique Filipino toilet practice of using tabo and timba.

Filipino CR Tutorial by Mikey Bustos

Last edited by spvillarama@up.edu.ph (Tuesday 1st of November 2016 09:34)

Offline

#3 Monday 31st of October 2016 07:29

Sam Agura
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Sam here~

One interesting I've seen in our culture that's pretty interesting is the courtship practices we have here in the Philippines. While we are already in the 21st century, most of our traditional courtship practices can still be seen in the rural areas and sometimes even in the big cities. While there are women who are okay with being the one to do the chasing after a guy, it is still preferred that it is the men who do the chasing after women.

One courtship practice that persists in some provinces in the country today is the "harana" or serenade where the man goes to the house of the woman with his friends to sing love songs to her in the hopes that they will be invited to the house and get an opportunity to express his intentions to the girl. Although it is seldom seen nowadays, it is still sometimes indulged in by the more old-fashioned menfolk. Since it is rather rare during these times, it elicits a lot of attention and gets a lot of brownie points for the man.

It is also a common practice to have a "tulay" or bridge, usually a close friend of the girl, whom the man approaches to ask for help in courting her.

It is also preferred by parents to have the men courting their daughters to come over to their house to visit and court, instead of doing it through text messages or going somewhere else. This is to ensure that the parents get to know who are interested in their daughters.

Ohhhh and I noticed someone posted a youtube link so I'll do the same: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WId8qkiEYw

Offline

#4 Tuesday 1st of November 2016 07:34

kyla.rocafort
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

When asked to reminisce memories, a typical Filipino would automatically drift back to his childhood memories of playing indoors and outdoors. It is through play that Filipino children are first exposed to the world. Play is how they learn and establish social relationships.

Filipino games require only simple materials that can easily be found at one’s house. Some games are imitations of what adults do. These include lutu-lutuan and bahay-bahayan which the girls loved playing. Trumpo or top is a popular game to boys. The trumpo resembles the shape of a cone and is made up of wood from guava branches. Players would let their trumpo spin on its iron nail in the middle of a drawn circle, and whoever trumpo spins the longest would be declared the winner.

Tumbang preso (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b1oK0Uh4a24), piko (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_mz04faqsY), patintero (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_jH_nir868), and luksong baka (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cic4ILX07hg) are just some examples of outdoor Filipino games. One can see children playing in an open space in their barrio at around 4pm as this is the habitually established time for outdoor games because the sun is not at its peak anymore. These type of games develop the child’s gross motor skills as you can see children running around, hopping and jumping.

Filipino indoor games include sungka, siklot and nanay-tatay. Sungka and siklot (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QFWpYS_pvM) uses shells or pebbles. These games develop one’s cognitive skills. Nanay-tatay also plays a role in developing cognitive skills but its developmental manifestation is seen in the hand-eye coordination. To know how nanay-tatay is played, watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZarBmqbnMRI.

Both Filipino indoor and outdoor games are easy to play. Some games can be played individually but most games require participation from other people. Filipino games play a major role in the culture as this is where children learn through experience. Playing for Filipino children enables them to be flexible, creative, resourceful and active.

Offline

#5 Tuesday 1st of November 2016 10:54

Ivanna Co
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Ivanna here!

In the Filipino culture, girls sometimes hold "debut" or coming-of-age celebrations to celebrate their legality. Guest count may range from around 60 to 500. The debutante wears a formal dress, sometimes even dresses. Guests are expected to wear semi-formal or formal, depending on what is stated by the debutante/invitation. Typical programs involve the cutting of the birthday cake, the 18 Roses (closest male friends and relatives wherein they dance with the debutante), and the 18 Candles (closest female friends and relatives wherein they speak of their wishes and for the debutante), and the debutante's thanksgiving speech. In some debuts, there are additional programs such as 18 Treasures (where they present the debutante with a gift), 18 Blue Bills (where they each give the debutante Php1000), and/or 18 Songs (where they sing to the debutante).  Photo booths, extravagant decorations, and drinks (be it alcoholic or not) are a regular in debuts. Of course, food is a staple as is in any Filipino party.

On the other hand, boys do not have a clear line of becoming a man. Some consider circumcision as the mark, while others say being able to hold down alcoholic beverages. Some merely say that a boy is considered a man once he turns 18, the age of legality here in the Philippines.

How does your culture celebrate coming-of-age?

Offline

#6 Tuesday 1st of November 2016 12:37

cetalastas
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi! This is Cathy from the Philippines.

It has always been part of the Filipino culture to provide hospitality to everyone. Hospitality is the trait characterized by showing warmth and generosity towards visitors and guests no matter what nationality they have. Filipinos will provide the best food to the visitors and will assure that their guests will feel comfortable with their stay. This pleasant treatment is shown not only those who are affluent but also those who are the poorest in the country.

Based on the Philippine history, hospitality is already evident in Filipinos when they have shown cordial welcome to the Spaniards and other colonizers of the Philippines. Even though Filipinos, experienced a lot of suffering with the colonizers, their hospitality never faded away. With this. we could really see how Filipinos give importance to hospitality in which they don’t consider the nationality or the past that they have experienced.

Being hospitable is both a positive and negative trait. Positive because Filipinos exhibit friendly reception of guests and always assure that the guests are having a good time and happiness in their stay. However, it could be also negative. It is because sometimes Filipinos tend to spend lavishly just to provide the guest sumptuous meal even if sometimes the money that they have is just enough for their family’s needs.

These are some of the common treatment of Filipinos to guests:
-If you arrive at their home, they will ask you right away to enter and to make yourself feel comfortable.
-Filipinos will joyfully welcome you with big smiles on their faces.
-Filipinos will prepare a lot of food and will force you to eat.
-Filipinos will share a lot of stories during your stay at their place.
-At the end of your visit, they will ask you to come back and take home some foods.

Indeed, hospitality will always be a part of the Filipino culture.
Check this link to see a clipart that depicts hospitality of Filipinos- http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qqgmBvJl0us/U … actual.jpg

Offline

#7 Tuesday 1st of November 2016 12:58

cetalastas
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi, Kyla!
       It is definitely true that play will always be a part of a Filipino's childhood memories. The different Filipino games enabled me to develop skills not only physically but also cognitively and socially. Through these Filipino games, I have learned how boundless that world could be. Interacting and playing with the kids around the neighborhood have resulted for me to understand the importance of "pakikisama". "Pakikisama" is also one of the common traits exhibited by most Filipinos wherein they go along with others.
       One of my favorite Filipino games is the Tumbang Preso. I and my siblings usually play that game because it is very entertaining and challenging. I guess that is the only game in which we really didn't lose interest with. Moreover, we commonly play it at 4 pm because at that time it is not too hot and not dark as well. Truly, Filipino games are one of the games that I will never forget.

       

kyla.rocafort wrote:

When asked to reminisce memories, a typical Filipino would automatically drift back to his childhood memories of playing indoors and outdoors. It is through play that Filipino children are first exposed to the world. Play is how they learn and establish social relationships.

Filipino games require only simple materials that can easily be found at one’s house. Some games are imitations of what adults do. These include lutu-lutuan and bahay-bahayan which the girls loved playing. Trumpo or top is a popular game to boys. The trumpo resembles the shape of a cone and is made up of wood from guava branches. Players would let their trumpo spin on its iron nail in the middle of a drawn circle, and whoever trumpo spins the longest would be declared the winner.

Tumbang preso (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b1oK0Uh4a24), piko (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_mz04faqsY), patintero (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_jH_nir868), and luksong baka (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cic4ILX07hg) are just some examples of outdoor Filipino games. One can see children playing in an open space in their barrio at around 4pm as this is the habitually established time for outdoor games because the sun is not at its peak anymore. These type of games develop the child’s gross motor skills as you can see children running around, hopping and jumping.

Filipino indoor games include sungka, siklot and nanay-tatay. Sungka and siklot (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QFWpYS_pvM) uses shells or pebbles. These games develop one’s cognitive skills. Nanay-tatay also plays a role in developing cognitive skills but its developmental manifestation is seen in the hand-eye coordination. To know how nanay-tatay is played, watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZarBmqbnMRI.

Both Filipino indoor and outdoor games are easy to play. Some games can be played individually but most games require participation from other people. Filipino games play a major role in the culture as this is where children learn through experience. Playing for Filipino children enables them to be flexible, creative, resourceful and active.

Offline

#8 Tuesday 1st of November 2016 13:18

cetalastas
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Indeed, Filipinos really value cleanliness. In our home, all of us in the family should take a bath in the morning and half-bath in the evening or else my mom will be mad at us. The use of tabo is also evident in our lifestyle. Even though we have overhead showers, we also have tabo and timba. My mom insisted that we should still have tabo and timba because there are times of the year when water is very limited. Thus, to be able to save water, we would use tabo and timba. When I had a chance to visit different countries, I have never seen any toilet which has tabo and timba except if that home is owned by Filipinos. With that, I guess the use of tabo will always be part of Filipino's lifestyle.
      No matter where one is, the traits and culture that one has will always be manifested. Just like some Filipinos who lives in another country, even though the use of tabo is not common to other countries, they make sure that they still have tabo and timba in their home.



spvillarama@up.edu.ph wrote:

Filipinos put a high value on cleanliness that taking a bath at least once or twice every day has been such an important part of everyday life. This habit may be attributed to the hot and humid climate in our country and the abundance of water seeing as we are surrounded by large bodies of water. We usually take a bath in the morning before leaving for work and one again in the evening before going to sleep. For some Filipinos who claim to only take a bath once a day, chances are they take what we call a “half bath” which involves cleaning the face, armpits, private parts and feet before sleeping.

http://i65.tinypic.com/5a5rmx.jpgg
                                                                                  The Philippines' famous tabo and timba

Unlike other countries, many Filipino households do not have overhead showers that is why the plastic tabo, pronounced as TAH-boh is an almost indispensable fixture in the Filipino home. Although it is most commonly found in the provinces, it is also widely used in the cities. The tabo and the timba, generally a plastic pail with a metal handle filled with water are the traditional Filipino hygiene tools used to clean the toilet floor, to get water to flush the toilet, and most importantly, to get water for personal cleanliness: for washing hands, for shampooing, and for bathing the whole body.

Also, not all toilets in the Philippines have a flush, so the tabo and the timba are also widely used for anal cleansing. Many Filipinos actually prefer this practice rather than using toilet paper since believe it or not, it will make you feel much cleaner and refreshed than using toilet paper alone. Worry not since Filipinos thoroughly wash their hands after going to the toilet using water and soap.

Click the YouTube link below if you want to learn more about the unique Filipino toilet practice of using tabo and timba.

Filipino CR Tutorial by Mikey Bustos

Offline

#9 Tuesday 1st of November 2016 15:56

kyla.rocafort
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Ivanna Co wrote:

Ivanna here!

In the Filipino culture, girls sometimes hold "debut" or coming-of-age celebrations to celebrate their legality. Guest count may range from around 60 to 500. The debutante wears a formal dress, sometimes even dresses. Guests are expected to wear semi-formal or formal, depending on what is stated by the debutante/invitation. Typical programs involve the cutting of the birthday cake, the 18 Roses (closest male friends and relatives wherein they dance with the debutante), and the 18 Candles (closest female friends and relatives wherein they speak of their wishes and for the debutante), and the debutante's thanksgiving speech. In some debuts, there are additional programs such as 18 Treasures (where they present the debutante with a gift), 18 Blue Bills (where they each give the debutante Php1000), and/or 18 Songs (where they sing to the debutante).  Photo booths, extravagant decorations, and drinks (be it alcoholic or not) are a regular in debuts. Of course, food is a staple as is in any Filipino party.

On the other hand, boys do not have a clear line of becoming a man. Some consider circumcision as the mark, while others say being able to hold down alcoholic beverages. Some merely say that a boy is considered a man once he turns 18, the age of legality here in the Philippines.

How does your culture celebrate coming-of-age?


Hi, Inee! I never really wanted to celebrate my coming-of-age because first I don't like feeling a year older and second, I don't want to be the center of attention in the party. This is why my mom, together with my creative aunt, planned a surprise debut party for me. They disguised it as a wedding, and I was excited back then because I love being part of the wedding entourage. It was a big surprise for me when I arrived in the venue as I saw my face all over the place! Yes, I had those 18 roses, 18 shots, 18 butterflies and many more. I had worn several gowns as well (good thing my mom has an eye for sizes!). I really feel special that night and teary as well when I got the chance to dance with my father, my grandfather and my two younger brothers. I never really imagined it to be so magical and fun. Indeed, it was one of the enchanted nights of my life. And I'm really grateful that my mom secretly planned that party.

I have a brother who's going to turn 18 next year. I think it's really not customary to plan celebration as big as the girls because based on what I learned from Humanities 1, debuts are held to show that the daughter in the family is already open to entertain suitors and engage in more intimate relationships. It marks the start of the adult life for the girl.

Offline

#10 Wednesday 2nd of November 2016 14:46

pdregalario
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

A topic I've always found intriguing is an article I once read regarding assisted suicide.

Here in the Philippines, suicide is such a sensitive issue and is generally looked down upon. And I suppose in other countries it is the same. It came as a surprise to me when I read about the term "assisted suicide" being legalized in Canada. Here's the link for anyone curious: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36566214. With Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (a man I truly respected) being one of the bannermen for assisted suicide, I was a little alarmed as to what exactly assisted suicide meant.

Based on what I've researched, the law that was passed in Canada allowed terminally ill patients to "choose to die with dignity." It granted the choice of death as a constitutional right of a person: the right not to suffer. Apparently, when a person is deemed to be terminally ill and is still of stable mental health to be able to make rational decisions, he/she can choose to end one's life and ask a physician to help in doing so. Physicians aren't required to help out in the assisted suicide, they are, however, required to refer the patient to a physician that will. (At least that's how I understood it. Please do correct me if I'm wrong.)

As OTs, I suppose we have the culture of not giving up on patients. A culture of finding ways to make ends meet no matter how unlikely or how difficult things can get. I suppose, then, that the idea of assisted suicide should be despicable and unthinkable to us. But in my opinion, after getting over my initial distaste for the term "assisted suicide" (because let's be honest it looks and sounds horrible especially in most societies where suicide is a huge taboo), there is an empowering aspect to the idea. I'm not saying that suicide is the answer to all our problems! NO! OF COURSE NOT! What I'm trying to say is that giving people the power to do what they want with what little left they can control in life can be empowering. Imagine being a healthy human being (physically, mentally and emotionally) one moment only to be hit by a terminal illness the next. Imagine doing everything right in your life only to find out that despite all the "healthy living", you still managed to acquire a terminal illness like cancer. Wouldn't that situation push anyone over the edge and make anyone feel that their entire life is spiraling out of control? Giving them the choice to keep on fighting or to die without succumbing to treatments that might as well kill them, shouldn't be seen as such a negative thing in my opinion.

What's your take on it? Do enlighten us. smile
-Paulyn

Offline

#11 Wednesday 2nd of November 2016 14:53

pdregalario
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

kyla.rocafort wrote:
Ivanna Co wrote:

Ivanna here!

In the Filipino culture, girls sometimes hold "debut" or coming-of-age celebrations to celebrate their legality. Guest count may range from around 60 to 500. The debutante wears a formal dress, sometimes even dresses. Guests are expected to wear semi-formal or formal, depending on what is stated by the debutante/invitation. Typical programs involve the cutting of the birthday cake, the 18 Roses (closest male friends and relatives wherein they dance with the debutante), and the 18 Candles (closest female friends and relatives wherein they speak of their wishes and for the debutante), and the debutante's thanksgiving speech. In some debuts, there are additional programs such as 18 Treasures (where they present the debutante with a gift), 18 Blue Bills (where they each give the debutante Php1000), and/or 18 Songs (where they sing to the debutante).  Photo booths, extravagant decorations, and drinks (be it alcoholic or not) are a regular in debuts. Of course, food is a staple as is in any Filipino party.

On the other hand, boys do not have a clear line of becoming a man. Some consider circumcision as the mark, while others say being able to hold down alcoholic beverages. Some merely say that a boy is considered a man once he turns 18, the age of legality here in the Philippines.

How does your culture celebrate coming-of-age?


Hi, Inee! I never really wanted to celebrate my coming-of-age because first I don't like feeling a year older and second, I don't want to be the center of attention in the party. This is why my mom, together with my creative aunt, planned a surprise debut party for me. They disguised it as a wedding, and I was excited back then because I love being part of the wedding entourage. It was a big surprise for me when I arrived in the venue as I saw my face all over the place! Yes, I had those 18 roses, 18 shots, 18 butterflies and many more. I had worn several gowns as well (good thing my mom has an eye for sizes!). I really feel special that night and teary as well when I got the chance to dance with my father, my grandfather and my two younger brothers. I never really imagined it to be so magical and fun. Indeed, it was one of the enchanted nights of my life. And I'm really grateful that my mom secretly planned that party.

I have a brother who's going to turn 18 next year. I think it's really not customary to plan celebration as big as the girls because based on what I learned from Humanities 1, debuts are held to show that the daughter in the family is already open to entertain suitors and engage in more intimate relationships. It marks the start of the adult life for the girl.

I agree with Kyla. I, too, was against the whole idea of a grand debut when I turned 18. Personally, I disliked being in a position where a room of people will be forced to turn their attention to me. And the entire ordeal seemed too bothersome in my opinion. Having attended a few grand celebration of debuts, I suppose there is a certain charm to it. I especially like the idea of being all dolled up and wearing fancy dresses and thinking up of themes for a debut. And it was always touching to see and hear the love and care people showed the debutant.

I still find it unfair, however, that only women are celebrated on their 18th birthday. EQUALITY, I say! But I suppose old habits die hard and you can't really teach an old dog new tricks (especially one as old as the Philippines).

Offline

#12 Wednesday 2nd of November 2016 16:31

etalas
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi Paulyn! Right after reading your reply, it feels like I'm 100% in favor of the "assisted suicide" because I believe that each and every one of us has the right to decide for him/herself. But after thinking again, lots of if(s) and but(s) entered my mind. What if people take it for granted? Wouldn't this lead to a negative world full of quitters? etc.......Suddenly, my mind was enlightened. The right of one must be the right of all, EQUALITY. Equality is something that must not be judged nor measured. In this case, equality could represent any of us, wanting to commit "assisted suicide" to end all sufferings. Who has the right to judge? No one, because it is only the owner of that body who knows every single thing inside that body including mind and spirit. We may have the same problem but my pain will always be different from yours.

In the Philippines, where 92% of the population is Christian, its legislation will need thousands of efforts. But the only effort that will succeed is the effort from the masses. So how? It is most likely that the concept of "assisted  suicide" will be against the belief of the 92% of the population. I don't know. Honestly, since I am a Filipino and a Christian at the same time, I can give a contrasting statement from what I have said earlier: You're wrong. We do not own our mind, body, and spirit. GOD owns everything. HE knows everything about you, your pain, and sufferings. You owe everything to HIM. HE will come soon to judge everyone so just wait for the "judgment day" (as they called it).

Are you guys familiar with the belief that if you committed suicide, your soul will just go to a very dark and lonely place and wait there until the "right time" came? The concept of "right time" is just like destiny where every thing was already planned before including date, time, and place of deaths. Share your thoughts!

pdregalario wrote:

A topic I've always found intriguing is an article I once read regarding assisted suicide.

Here in the Philippines, suicide is such a sensitive issue and is generally looked down upon. And I suppose in other countries it is the same. It came as a surprise to me when I read about the term "assisted suicide" being legalized in Canada. Here's the link for anyone curious: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36566214. With Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (a man I truly respected) being one of the bannermen for assisted suicide, I was a little alarmed as to what exactly assisted suicide meant.

Based on what I've researched, the law that was passed in Canada allowed terminally ill patients to "choose to die with dignity." It granted the choice of death as a constitutional right of a person: the right not to suffer. Apparently, when a person is deemed to be terminally ill and is still of stable mental health to be able to make rational decisions, he/she can choose to end one's life and ask a physician to help in doing so. Physicians aren't required to help out in the assisted suicide, they are, however, required to refer the patient to a physician that will. (At least that's how I understood it. Please do correct me if I'm wrong.)

As OTs, I suppose we have the culture of not giving up on patients. A culture of finding ways to make ends meet no matter how unlikely or how difficult things can get. I suppose, then, that the idea of assisted suicide should be despicable and unthinkable to us. But in my opinion, after getting over my initial distaste for the term "assisted suicide" (because let's be honest it looks and sounds horrible especially in most societies where suicide is a huge taboo), there is an empowering aspect to the idea. I'm not saying that suicide is the answer to all our problems! NO! OF COURSE NOT! What I'm trying to say is that giving people the power to do what they want with what little left they can control in life can be empowering. Imagine being a healthy human being (physically, mentally and emotionally) one moment only to be hit by a terminal illness the next. Imagine doing everything right in your life only to find out that despite all the "healthy living", you still managed to acquire a terminal illness like cancer. Wouldn't that situation push anyone over the edge and make anyone feel that their entire life is spiraling out of control? Giving them the choice to keep on fighting or to die without succumbing to treatments that might as well kill them, shouldn't be seen as such a negative thing in my opinion.

What's your take on it? Do enlighten us. smile
-Paulyn

Offline

#13 Wednesday 2nd of November 2016 17:00

etalas
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi guys! In the Philippines, aside from Christmas, New Year, and birthdays, citizens are also celebrating FIESTAS!!! Fiestas are held on the birthday of the patron saint and we have lots of saints here in our country so every town and city has a fiesta of its own. I've just realized that fiestas could fall under the category of birthdays hehe smile Let's continue. Inside the churches, novenas and special prayers are to be spoken. But there's more! Fiestas are celebrated as lively as the people can!!! Parades full of efforts are always present. People joining the parades have extraordinary costumes, masks, make-ups, and head-dresses that were prepared couple of months before the fiesta. Combos (bands during fiestas) have this role of energizing the parade by loud sounds and hard beats. Fiestas are also considered a thanksgiving day that's why at homes, you would expect so much food and visitors from other towns.

Celebrating fiestas has its advantages and disadvantages. Any idea? Would you like to suggest any modification? Should we still continue it?

Offline

#14 Wednesday 2nd of November 2016 17:57

pdregalario
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

I know the topic I chose to introduce is a little morbid and dark so I thank you for engaging me on this.

Being guided by religion, it does seem like assisted suicide is a sin and would eventually lead to other unspeakable acts. Even though I was raised in a Catholic family and even though I spent roughly 7 years in a Catholic school, I still see some merit to assisted suicide. As I have mentioned earlier, assisted suicide was a practice that can only be availed by those terminally ill and those deemed to be of mental stability. It can be argued that terminally ill people cannot be mentally sound because of death looking over their shoulder but aren't we all dead men walking? Okay, that came out more negatively than I had hoped... Hmm... Going back, if they were already dying anyway, why should it be considered wrong? Death is inevitable, especially to those whose days are literally numbered. Would it matter if an already dying person dies a day, a week or a month earlier? The way I see it, assisted suicide will give them a choice. Instead of experiencing excruciating pain, they get to throw in the towel when they are still themselves and not mere shadows of what they used to be.

Looking at it with God in mind, as you've pointed out, it truly does paint assisted suicide in a negative light. Especially when you consider your life not being your own. I suppose that is why most of us cling to religion so dearly. Religion can provide meaning that we sometimes cannot find in life. I, for one, wouldn't want my loved one to choose death if there is even a slight possibility of his/her recovery. I'm sure that it would have killed me if my grandfather who was diagnosed with liver cancer, stage 4, simply chose to die instead of fighting. It's easy to say that assisted suicide, or simply suicide is the coward's way that is unacceptable and wrong in all levels of morality. But hear me out.

When my grandfather fell ill, I saw with my own eyes how quickly his health degenerated. He was the type of person who took pride in being able to walk on his own without any help or assistance. That same proud man became someone who couldn't even sit up on his own. I saw how much it pained him, more than his illness, how dependent he had become. How powerless he had felt. I saw how much his illness killed him and how the pain was unbearable even with pain medications. I would have loved more than anything to have been able to be with my grandfather longer. I would have given up anything even the prestige of studying in the premier university in our country if it meant my grandfather would still be here with me. But whenever I saw how much he suffered, whenever I saw how much he struggled, fighting an illness the doctors themselves refused to take on, I saw how selfish it was of me to wish him to stay longer knowing that it was simply causing him pain. He would have died anyway. He would have. He wasn't given the choice not to feel helpless. He wasn't given the choice not to feel the pain he did. Because of morality. Because of the view that suicide is the coward's way out. I'm grateful that when he passed, he wasn't in excruciating pain but what if he had? What if the pain became too unbearable? Was he suppose to just bear it knowing very well that he was going to succumb to it eventually? Were we supposed to just watch him fight a losing battle? This is precisely why I cannot help but see the choice as important. This is why I cannot simply condemn assisted suicide as all bad. I agree that it can be considered a horrible sin, a quitter's solution. But I cannot ignore the hope that can stem out from the idea that you have a choice, no matter how dire your situation is. That you have an out.

Not everyone wants an out. Not everyone needs it. But for those who do, wouldn't it be kind and merciful to provide them with at least a choice?

etalas wrote:

Hi Paulyn! Right after reading your reply, it feels like I'm 100% in favor of the "assisted suicide" because I believe that each and every one of us has the right to decide for him/herself. But after thinking again, lots of if(s) and but(s) entered my mind. What if people take it for granted? Wouldn't this lead to a negative world full of quitters? etc.......Suddenly, my mind was enlightened. The right of one must be the right of all, EQUALITY. Equality is something that must not be judged nor measured. In this case, equality could represent any of us, wanting to commit "assisted suicide" to end all sufferings. Who has the right to judge? No one, because it is only the owner of that body who knows every single thing inside that body including mind and spirit. We may have the same problem but my pain will always be different from yours.

In the Philippines, where 92% of the population is Christian, its legislation will need thousands of efforts. But the only effort that will succeed is the effort from the masses. So how? It is most likely that the concept of "assisted  suicide" will be against the belief of the 92% of the population. I don't know. Honestly, since I am a Filipino and a Christian at the same time, I can give a contrasting statement from what I have said earlier: You're wrong. We do not own our mind, body, and spirit. GOD owns everything. HE knows everything about you, your pain, and sufferings. You owe everything to HIM. HE will come soon to judge everyone so just wait for the "judgment day" (as they called it).

Are you guys familiar with the belief that if you committed suicide, your soul will just go to a very dark and lonely place and wait there until the "right time" came? The concept of "right time" is just like destiny where every thing was already planned before including date, time, and place of deaths. Share your thoughts!

pdregalario wrote:

A topic I've always found intriguing is an article I once read regarding assisted suicide.

Here in the Philippines, suicide is such a sensitive issue and is generally looked down upon. And I suppose in other countries it is the same. It came as a surprise to me when I read about the term "assisted suicide" being legalized in Canada. Here's the link for anyone curious: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36566214. With Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (a man I truly respected) being one of the bannermen for assisted suicide, I was a little alarmed as to what exactly assisted suicide meant.

Based on what I've researched, the law that was passed in Canada allowed terminally ill patients to "choose to die with dignity." It granted the choice of death as a constitutional right of a person: the right not to suffer. Apparently, when a person is deemed to be terminally ill and is still of stable mental health to be able to make rational decisions, he/she can choose to end one's life and ask a physician to help in doing so. Physicians aren't required to help out in the assisted suicide, they are, however, required to refer the patient to a physician that will. (At least that's how I understood it. Please do correct me if I'm wrong.)

As OTs, I suppose we have the culture of not giving up on patients. A culture of finding ways to make ends meet no matter how unlikely or how difficult things can get. I suppose, then, that the idea of assisted suicide should be despicable and unthinkable to us. But in my opinion, after getting over my initial distaste for the term "assisted suicide" (because let's be honest it looks and sounds horrible especially in most societies where suicide is a huge taboo), there is an empowering aspect to the idea. I'm not saying that suicide is the answer to all our problems! NO! OF COURSE NOT! What I'm trying to say is that giving people the power to do what they want with what little left they can control in life can be empowering. Imagine being a healthy human being (physically, mentally and emotionally) one moment only to be hit by a terminal illness the next. Imagine doing everything right in your life only to find out that despite all the "healthy living", you still managed to acquire a terminal illness like cancer. Wouldn't that situation push anyone over the edge and make anyone feel that their entire life is spiraling out of control? Giving them the choice to keep on fighting or to die without succumbing to treatments that might as well kill them, shouldn't be seen as such a negative thing in my opinion.

What's your take on it? Do enlighten us. smile
-Paulyn

Offline

#15 Wednesday 2nd of November 2016 19:02

RichardIrvin
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi guys!
So just a short background: My family moved here to the Philippines to flee from the raging war in China back then. My grandparents arrived here with little money and scarce food. We struggled to survive here as we are not natives of this place. Now, we live in Binondo, a district in Manila referred to as the city's Chinatown, with other Chinese-Filipino people. I live in a society dominated by Chinese culture.

There is no society where all professions are taken equally. The Philippines has a slightly different set of concepts regarding different professions with reference to other countries of the world. For example, business and medicine are traditionally chosen in my society and rightly so because there is a demand for these occupations in the Philippine market. Now the question is not about the demand and economics about the labor market but the perception of these jobs. One thing is pretty clear, that the perception is closely linked with money, power and contribution to society. In the Philippines, jobs like business and medicine gives money or even hugely contributes to society than anything else, hence is encouraged and holds a higher degree of prestige. While in a more developed nation, mathematics and other liberal arts and sciences also have a decent demand and pays decently and the contribution to society by these field are large too. So overall, it is the relative importance by the society through money, power and in parts, the contribution one makes in the society that encourages or discourages certain occupations. We have an underdeveloped economy, but once the development takes a speed, more jobs will be created, a diversification will happen, urban population will increase and we will have demand for different professions and their relative importance will increase.

Since the Filipino family is very interdependent, a capable family member would want to land a high-paying job to help his/her parents, siblings and children. Many Filipino families are struggling and want the children to become rich, so the parents pressure their children to study hard and get good grades so that they can get a better profession and thus, more money. Then there is all this social competition among relatives and families. Children here study so much they forget to live. They wont be able to discover sports, cooking, music and what else. Its really tough. They wont even know what profession would suit them when they have to make the decision. However, some students are already trying to balance leisure and studies so I think this is a good start. Most Filipinos are also very practical and realistic. They overlook the value of meaning and satisfaction. They would choose a high-paying job rather than something they really want to do. Occupational deprivation is evident here as the person cannot do his valued occupation. And this is caused by a global problem: poverty. There are a lot of college students in the Philippines where they do not like the program they are in. An example would be a friend of mine, he wanted to study graphic design and cinematography; however, his parents disapproved and now, he is studying to get a degree in business management. As OTs, we know the concepts of occupational balance, occupational competence and other factors that affect a person's occupational engagement. I believe that we can and must help them compromise in the occupation they are in. We can help them feel competent in whatever they choose to do.

Disclaimer: I am not insinuating that parents are very controlling of their child's life and future.

Offline

#16 Sunday 6th of November 2016 03:39

kyla.rocafort
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

pdregalario wrote:

A topic I've always found intriguing is an article I once read regarding assisted suicide.

Here in the Philippines, suicide is such a sensitive issue and is generally looked down upon. And I suppose in other countries it is the same. It came as a surprise to me when I read about the term "assisted suicide" being legalized in Canada. Here's the link for anyone curious: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36566214. With Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (a man I truly respected) being one of the bannermen for assisted suicide, I was a little alarmed as to what exactly assisted suicide meant.

Based on what I've researched, the law that was passed in Canada allowed terminally ill patients to "choose to die with dignity." It granted the choice of death as a constitutional right of a person: the right not to suffer. Apparently, when a person is deemed to be terminally ill and is still of stable mental health to be able to make rational decisions, he/she can choose to end one's life and ask a physician to help in doing so. Physicians aren't required to help out in the assisted suicide, they are, however, required to refer the patient to a physician that will. (At least that's how I understood it. Please do correct me if I'm wrong.)

As OTs, I suppose we have the culture of not giving up on patients. A culture of finding ways to make ends meet no matter how unlikely or how difficult things can get. I suppose, then, that the idea of assisted suicide should be despicable and unthinkable to us. But in my opinion, after getting over my initial distaste for the term "assisted suicide" (because let's be honest it looks and sounds horrible especially in most societies where suicide is a huge taboo), there is an empowering aspect to the idea. I'm not saying that suicide is the answer to all our problems! NO! OF COURSE NOT! What I'm trying to say is that giving people the power to do what they want with what little left they can control in life can be empowering. Imagine being a healthy human being (physically, mentally and emotionally) one moment only to be hit by a terminal illness the next. Imagine doing everything right in your life only to find out that despite all the "healthy living", you still managed to acquire a terminal illness like cancer. Wouldn't that situation push anyone over the edge and make anyone feel that their entire life is spiraling out of control? Giving them the choice to keep on fighting or to die without succumbing to treatments that might as well kill them, shouldn't be seen as such a negative thing in my opinion.

What's your take on it? Do enlighten us. smile
-Paulyn

Hello, Paulyn! This is such an interesting topic. I remembered one of our topics in Christian Living (Religion) back in high school. May I just ask, is assisted suicide equivalent to euthanasia? Euthanasia was the first thing that came into my mind when I read your post. I browsed the internet to make sure I'm on the right track. As a student from a Catholic school, euthanasia is illegal. However, I found out that medical practitioners here in the Philippines are unconsciously (or maybe even consciously) performing euthanasia. I remembered back when I was a child where my great grandmother (101 years old if I remember correctly) was in the hospital bed. I think I heard my relatives talking about stopping the machines that help her live because they thought that it just increases and prolongs the suffering of my grandmother. I clearly remember the doctor giving out the consent form (for my aunt to sign) for the termination of medications.

Because of the predominance of the Catholic sector, euthanasia is illegal in the Philippines and is therefore punishable by law. It comes in different forms that's why people might be unconsciously performing it. It may be active euthanasia where a person will inject doses of sedatives or passive euthanasia where the person will just withhold the medicines. With that issue, I think it is important for us Filipinos to discuss and debate on this matter because I think it can lessen the harm and negative consequences. Being illegal, euthanasia makes people do more illegal acts (illegally purchasing terminating drugs, violating hospital rules, etc). If majority of the citizens opt to perform euthanasia (or assisted suicide), why not be open and considerate on this matter? (Feel free to enlighten me more and correct my misconceptions smile )

And yes, like you I love how OTs make ways to achieve personal goals no matter how hard it seems. We see each life as important as ours that's why OTs do everything they can to promote life and well-being.


I'm really hoping to discuss more about the topic on assisted suicide with you! smile

Offline

#17 Wednesday 9th of November 2016 06:02

pdregalario
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

kyla.rocafort wrote:
pdregalario wrote:

A topic I've always found intriguing is an article I once read regarding assisted suicide.

Here in the Philippines, suicide is such a sensitive issue and is generally looked down upon. And I suppose in other countries it is the same. It came as a surprise to me when I read about the term "assisted suicide" being legalized in Canada. Here's the link for anyone curious: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36566214. With Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (a man I truly respected) being one of the bannermen for assisted suicide, I was a little alarmed as to what exactly assisted suicide meant.

Based on what I've researched, the law that was passed in Canada allowed terminally ill patients to "choose to die with dignity." It granted the choice of death as a constitutional right of a person: the right not to suffer. Apparently, when a person is deemed to be terminally ill and is still of stable mental health to be able to make rational decisions, he/she can choose to end one's life and ask a physician to help in doing so. Physicians aren't required to help out in the assisted suicide, they are, however, required to refer the patient to a physician that will. (At least that's how I understood it. Please do correct me if I'm wrong.)

As OTs, I suppose we have the culture of not giving up on patients. A culture of finding ways to make ends meet no matter how unlikely or how difficult things can get. I suppose, then, that the idea of assisted suicide should be despicable and unthinkable to us. But in my opinion, after getting over my initial distaste for the term "assisted suicide" (because let's be honest it looks and sounds horrible especially in most societies where suicide is a huge taboo), there is an empowering aspect to the idea. I'm not saying that suicide is the answer to all our problems! NO! OF COURSE NOT! What I'm trying to say is that giving people the power to do what they want with what little left they can control in life can be empowering. Imagine being a healthy human being (physically, mentally and emotionally) one moment only to be hit by a terminal illness the next. Imagine doing everything right in your life only to find out that despite all the "healthy living", you still managed to acquire a terminal illness like cancer. Wouldn't that situation push anyone over the edge and make anyone feel that their entire life is spiraling out of control? Giving them the choice to keep on fighting or to die without succumbing to treatments that might as well kill them, shouldn't be seen as such a negative thing in my opinion.

What's your take on it? Do enlighten us. smile
-Paulyn

Hello, Paulyn! This is such an interesting topic. I remembered one of our topics in Christian Living (Religion) back in high school. May I just ask, is assisted suicide equivalent to euthanasia? Euthanasia was the first thing that came into my mind when I read your post. I browsed the internet to make sure I'm on the right track. As a student from a Catholic school, euthanasia is illegal. However, I found out that medical practitioners here in the Philippines are unconsciously (or maybe even consciously) performing euthanasia. I remembered back when I was a child where my great grandmother (101 years old if I remember correctly) was in the hospital bed. I think I heard my relatives talking about stopping the machines that help her live because they thought that it just increases and prolongs the suffering of my grandmother. I clearly remember the doctor giving out the consent form (for my aunt to sign) for the termination of medications.

Because of the predominance of the Catholic sector, euthanasia is illegal in the Philippines and is therefore punishable by law. It comes in different forms that's why people might be unconsciously performing it. It may be active euthanasia where a person will inject doses of sedatives or passive euthanasia where the person will just withhold the medicines. With that issue, I think it is important for us Filipinos to discuss and debate on this matter because I think it can lessen the harm and negative consequences. Being illegal, euthanasia makes people do more illegal acts (illegally purchasing terminating drugs, violating hospital rules, etc). If majority of the citizens opt to perform euthanasia (or assisted suicide), why not be open and considerate on this matter? (Feel free to enlighten me more and correct my misconceptions smile )

And yes, like you I love how OTs make ways to achieve personal goals no matter how hard it seems. We see each life as important as ours that's why OTs do everything they can to promote life and well-being.


I'm really hoping to discuss more about the topic on assisted suicide with you! smile

Assisted suicide and euthanasia aren't entirely equivalent in the sense that not all forms of euthanasia can be considered assisted suicide. In assisted suicide, the choice of the patient is emphasized whereas in euthanasia, the choice and/or consent of the patient in question may or may not be considered. Again, I must emphasize that the rational and informed choice of the patient is the keystone for assisted suicide.

I do not claim to be a law expert but I was able to research a few articles regarding laws that concern euthanasia. The CHR or the Commission on Human Rights has already maintained a position against euthanasia. According to their website, in history, the proposed Magna Carta for Patient's Rights and Responsibilities used to have a provision that entitled a patient the right to refuse treatment. A later bill that focused on euthanasia was then proposed but was not passed. Again, I'm no expert so I am not sure what exactly are the implications of a bill focusing on euthanasia not being passed, nor do I know if the mentioned provision that entitled a patient to refuse treatment is still part of the Magna Carta for Patient's Rights and Responsibilities. As such, I cannot tell you if what you termed "passive euthanasia" is illegal as I am not entirely sure if the right to refuse treatment is actually still a thing. I do, however, recognise that euthanasia is generally unacceptable to our society and culture and, by extension, deemed illegal in our supposed conservative nation.

Euthanasia is certainly abhorrent and unacceptable to a supposed religious country (the very same religious country that condones extrajudicial killings and the burial of a dictator who ordered the torture and slaughter of thousands of lives in a place of high honor and regard *woops shots fired*). But as I have repeatedly mentioned before in previous posts, there are merits to assisted suicide. I do not want to sound like a droning parrot speaking in an endless loop but I cannot emphasize it enough. And although euthanasia is considered evil in all forms, euthanasia isn't entirely synonymous to assisted suicide.

I would also like to point out that Christianity hasn't always frowned upon suicide. In fact, it wasn't until St. Augustine formally condemned suicide as a sin in his book City of God that suicide was considered as such. Before that, suicide actually became quite the fad for Christians with the mentality that bringing death to oneself was preferable to eternal damnation because the idea of possible sin one may commit in the future was too horrendous. Kill yourself while you're still considered nice and acceptable enough for heaven. That was the motto before St. Augustine said otherwise. What I'm trying to say is that even the religious saw merits to suicide at one point in history. There are also other cultures that find suicide acceptable. I will not delve deeper into that topic but I'm just saying... Definitions and ideas are constantly being defined and redefined.

Although there have been attempts in discussing euthanasia in the Philippines, and although such discussions were cut short because of the overwhelming rejection of the religious and the like, I agree with you, Kyla, that discussions about it must continue. No matter how morbid the topic is.

Thank you for sharing your piece with me. I hope we can discuss this further. Feel free to correct me about anything. I'm more than happy to learn from my mistakes. smile
-Paulyn

Offline

#18 Wednesday 9th of November 2016 06:29

pdregalario
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

In recent news, I think it should be unacceptable to elect racist and misogynistic oranges for any position of power.

What's your take on it? Should racist misogynistic oranges that constantly violate other people's rights through hateful words and actions be given their right to run for office and even, God forbid, run an entire country? Should misogynistic and racist people be allowed to vote for racist and misogynistic people? But that's democracy for you, I guess...

Update: Electing racist and misogynistic oranges is totally acceptable in USA. smile

In other news, how good is the OT practice in Canada?

Last edited by pdregalario (Wednesday 9th of November 2016 08:52)

Offline

#19 Wednesday 9th of November 2016 10:16

sagacho
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi I'm Sam G from the Philippines!

There are a lot of unique ways on how we do occupations here in the Philippines but I'll share with you one of the most common occupations I do - commuting! Here in the Philippines the most popular means of public transportation is the Jeepney. It is really popular because it has a relatively cheap fare and we have lot of it here.The idea of jeepneys here in the Philippines originally came from the US. There were a lot of military jeepneys left after the World War II and they were sold and given to the local Filipinos. Filipinos then started to modify it such as adding roofs and painting it with vibrant colors and due to its seating design that can accommodate many people the jeepney  became a common public transporting vehicle.


This is a picture of a military jeep during World War II
http://www.tourisminthephilippines.com/ … 2%2001.jpg

This is picture of a typical jeep here in the Philippines today
http://www.filipiknow.net/wp-content/up … ppines.jpg

Commuting is a really important occupation for us Filipinos, especially now that the traffic here is really really heavy and we are discouraged to bring our own private vehicles to go to school or to work. I have to admit that some of our public vehicles are not accessible to persons with disabilities. And this is one  of the many thoughts that I am bothered about when I am commuting. The jeepney is relatively crowded and it has a really low roof and a person with  physical disability can not take this means of transportation and a PWD has no choice but to take another means of transportation. Another famous public transportation we have is our rail transits. Our rail transits have a specific area for PWDs, senior citizens and pregnant women but based on my observation this doesn't make sense. Around hundreds of thousands of riders everyday and also considering the few number of operational trains we have  the rail transits are always congested  and the special area for the PWDs is also jammed you can't even make a space to breathe what more for a wheel chair or crutches. You'll actually feel like a sardine inside the train for a moment.

Commuting is already a part of every Filipino's life and I am looking forward that soon we'll have more accessible and more inclusive transportation for the PWD commuters. As a future Occupational Therapist I would love to handle clients that would like to  commute independently but I know this will be very very hard considering the system of our transportation here. I hope in the near future we can do something about this one step at a time. smile

Any commute stories you want to share guys? smile

Last edited by sagacho (Wednesday 9th of November 2016 15:53)

Offline

#20 Wednesday 9th of November 2016 10:33

sagacho
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi Richard!

I totally agree with you. Some Filipinos have the tendency to choose profit over passion. They would prefer to get a job that has a higher salary than doing something they love. And I would also like to add that some Filipinos also have the attitude of looking down to art courses and they would always comment that "It's just a hobby". It's really sad to hear this kind of perspective. I also have very artistic friends in high school and they wanted to take arts and design courses but they would tell me, " walang pera sa art (there's no money in art)."  Confucius said, “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." I guess a lot of people are working today because they chose what is more practical over passion. But I still understand this kind of attitude most people have. Filipinos are known for being family-oriented. They'll choose what's best for their family and that's why they choose  jobs that are more profitable and they are willing to sacrifice their passions. I am very lucky that I'll be in a profession that I am very passionate about and can also help me provide enough for my family.


RichardIrvin wrote:

Hi guys!
So just a short background: My family moved here to the Philippines to flee from the raging war in China back then. My grandparents arrived here with little money and scarce food. We struggled to survive here as we are not natives of this place. Now, we live in Binondo, a district in Manila referred to as the city's Chinatown, with other Chinese-Filipino people. I live in a society dominated by Chinese culture.

There is no society where all professions are taken equally. The Philippines has a slightly different set of concepts regarding different professions with reference to other countries of the world. For example, business and medicine are traditionally chosen in my society and rightly so because there is a demand for these occupations in the Philippine market. Now the question is not about the demand and economics about the labor market but the perception of these jobs. One thing is pretty clear, that the perception is closely linked with money, power and contribution to society. In the Philippines, jobs like business and medicine gives money or even hugely contributes to society than anything else, hence is encouraged and holds a higher degree of prestige. While in a more developed nation, mathematics and other liberal arts and sciences also have a decent demand and pays decently and the contribution to society by these field are large too. So overall, it is the relative importance by the society through money, power and in parts, the contribution one makes in the society that encourages or discourages certain occupations. We have an underdeveloped economy, but once the development takes a speed, more jobs will be created, a diversification will happen, urban population will increase and we will have demand for different professions and their relative importance will increase.

Since the Filipino family is very interdependent, a capable family member would want to land a high-paying job to help his/her parents, siblings and children. Many Filipino families are struggling and want the children to become rich, so the parents pressure their children to study hard and get good grades so that they can get a better profession and thus, more money. Then there is all this social competition among relatives and families. Children here study so much they forget to live. They wont be able to discover sports, cooking, music and what else. Its really tough. They wont even know what profession would suit them when they have to make the decision. However, some students are already trying to balance leisure and studies so I think this is a good start. Most Filipinos are also very practical and realistic. They overlook the value of meaning and satisfaction. They would choose a high-paying job rather than something they really want to do. Occupational deprivation is evident here as the person cannot do his valued occupation. And this is caused by a global problem: poverty. There are a lot of college students in the Philippines where they do not like the program they are in. An example would be a friend of mine, he wanted to study graphic design and cinematography; however, his parents disapproved and now, he is studying to get a degree in business management. As OTs, we know the concepts of occupational balance, occupational competence and other factors that affect a person's occupational engagement. I believe that we can and must help them compromise in the occupation they are in. We can help them feel competent in whatever they choose to do.

Disclaimer: I am not insinuating that parents are very controlling of their child's life and future.

Last edited by sagacho (Wednesday 9th of November 2016 15:55)

Offline

#21 Wednesday 9th of November 2016 15:30

gvyrastorza
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

pdregalario wrote:

In recent news, I think it should be unacceptable to elect racist and misogynistic oranges for any position of power.

What's your take on it? Should racist misogynistic oranges that constantly violate other people's rights through hateful words and actions be given their right to run for office and even, God forbid, run an entire country? Should misogynistic and racist people be allowed to vote for racist and misogynistic people? But that's democracy for you, I guess...

Update: Electing racist and misogynistic oranges is totally acceptable in USA. smile

In other news, how good is the OT practice in Canada?

Hello, Paulyn!

Although the topic seems rather interesting, I have to say that that should be a post for a separate topic which, to my knowledge, belongs on another board. You could try the board on working in another country. I cannot exactly find a board for talking about politics, however, but I may not have searched hard enough.

However, what I do want to note is that I believe that the changing reins of power in a country and the inevitable fluctuation of laws that will follow should be taken into account by all OTs, and it is within an OTs duties to step in and voice out when any of these changes hinder the abilities of people to perform occupations important to them. Not just this, but OTs must take into account these changes and adjust, and help their clients to adjust to these changes, adapt to them in order to perform important occupations despite such changes.

Changes in the social environment are inevitable, and it is part of the job of the OT to help the client adapt to these very changes - or adapt their very occupations, or even the environment - in the process.

Just my two cents.

Offline

#22 Wednesday 9th of November 2016 15:49

gvyrastorza
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

My mother always believed that a person's upbringing could be seen clearly by the way they eat, so I've been taught at a young age different ways to eat in different situations.

In the Philippines, or at least in the provinces, one of the usual ways to eat is simply using the hands. Whether it's rice, meat, or vegetable, we use our hands, often picking from a communal plate (or rather, banana leaf). Utensils aren't used as often as they are in the cities. Eating also tends to be faster, as you have only your hands to eat, meaning there is no portioning of food, and everyone must race to get their fill. Eating is much slower in the cities where the fork and spoon rule over porcelain or paper plates with well-portioned meals given to everyone. No competition for more food, and no need to dirty your hands to eat.

The fork and spoon, I must say, seem to be remnants of Spanish influence. I come from Basque descent, and my family quite enjoys Spanish cuisine. Much of the cuisine is saucy and pre-cut, so forks and spoons would seem perfect for them. I cannot say for certain if this is how things go in Spain, but from what I know of my family, this seems the case.

Having a bit of Chinese (and apparently, Japanese) blood, my family is also well-versed with using chopsticks. These are very simple yet difficult to master instruments, and even until now I struggle to use them. Because my East-Asian blood is very dilute, I doubt much of what we do is proper for chopsticks, but the vast difference in the way they are used in comparison to the standard fork and spoon just shows how different cultures are.

Finally, for those countries which do not often eat rice or similar foods, spoons are often lacking, replaced with knives which, I know, stems all the way back to Medieval times, possibly further back. I only know that knives are more obvious choices for cutlery in places where the primary source of carbohydrates was wheat (which is used for making bread, to clarify). Other than that, I cannot say much else about this.

Overall, culture and history, as well as geography, plant distribution, and so many other factors, affect the way people eat all over the globe. I have to apologize if anything I said is wrong; all of this information I've deduced from personal experience. But I think I've proven my point that eating, as basic a need as it is, varies so widely from place to place. And this hasn't even gone to accounting for all those individual cases where a person cannot eat normally for any reason at all.

Offline

#23 Wednesday 9th of November 2016 17:03

RichardIrvin
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hey Sam!

I must say, that is a good insight. It is sad that this is an evident problem and yet there is little we can do about it; it is already woven into the Filipino culture.
When a person chooses to pursue his passion, it is called dignity of labor and I'm sorry to say that some Filipinos don't have it. There is such a high premium placed on doctors, businessmen and engineers that it is difficult for any other profession to compete with the social standing these professions bring. Personally, I think doctors get way too much respect than they deserve. Sure, they can save your lives but in a country like the Philippines, they can just as easily take it away. With majority of the population struggling, I doubt they have enough money to buy the medicines needed to survive. The number of doctors who are in the pockets of pharmaceutical industries has been rising exponentially. It's a stigma and I hope that it will go away soon. The younger generation is already diversifying and bringing more to the plate. With role models who are not traditional doctors or businessmen, more kids will grow up thinking they could be the next Vincent van Gogh or something.

Furthermore, the fact that art courses still exist means that there is still hope. Arts and Humanities are not dead yet. We are future OTs. We should help our clients achieve a life worth living! And one way to do that is doing something he / she loves! This is one of the reasons why I love this program.

I truly believe that a fulfilling life is greater than money. Life isn't always about how fat one's wallet is, or how loaded his / her bank account is. It is doing something you really enjoy. And the sooner people in this world realize that, the better this place will be. Maybe even extend the life expectancy range smile

sagacho wrote:

Hi Richard!

I totally agree with you. Some Filipinos have the tendency to choose profit over passion. They would prefer to get a job that has a higher salary than doing something they love. And I would also like to add that some Filipinos also have the attitude of looking down to art courses and they would always comment that "It's just a hobby". It's really sad to hear this kind of perspective. I also have very artistic friends in high school and they wanted to take arts and design courses but they would tell me, " walang pera sa art (there's no money in art)."  Confucius said, “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." I guess a lot of people are working today because they chose what is more practical over passion. But I still understand this kind of attitude most people have. Filipinos are known for being family-oriented. They'll choose what's best for their family and that's why they choose  jobs that are more profitable and they are willing to sacrifice their passions. I am very lucky that I'll be in a profession that I am very passionate about and can also help me provide enough for my family.


RichardIrvin wrote:

Hi guys!
So just a short background: My family moved here to the Philippines to flee from the raging war in China back then. My grandparents arrived here with little money and scarce food. We struggled to survive here as we are not natives of this place. Now, we live in Binondo, a district in Manila referred to as the city's Chinatown, with other Chinese-Filipino people. I live in a society dominated by Chinese culture.

There is no society where all professions are taken equally. The Philippines has a slightly different set of concepts regarding different professions with reference to other countries of the world. For example, business and medicine are traditionally chosen in my society and rightly so because there is a demand for these occupations in the Philippine market. Now the question is not about the demand and economics about the labor market but the perception of these jobs. One thing is pretty clear, that the perception is closely linked with money, power and contribution to society. In the Philippines, jobs like business and medicine gives money or even hugely contributes to society than anything else, hence is encouraged and holds a higher degree of prestige. While in a more developed nation, mathematics and other liberal arts and sciences also have a decent demand and pays decently and the contribution to society by these field are large too. So overall, it is the relative importance by the society through money, power and in parts, the contribution one makes in the society that encourages or discourages certain occupations. We have an underdeveloped economy, but once the development takes a speed, more jobs will be created, a diversification will happen, urban population will increase and we will have demand for different professions and their relative importance will increase.

Since the Filipino family is very interdependent, a capable family member would want to land a high-paying job to help his/her parents, siblings and children. Many Filipino families are struggling and want the children to become rich, so the parents pressure their children to study hard and get good grades so that they can get a better profession and thus, more money. Then there is all this social competition among relatives and families. Children here study so much they forget to live. They wont be able to discover sports, cooking, music and what else. Its really tough. They wont even know what profession would suit them when they have to make the decision. However, some students are already trying to balance leisure and studies so I think this is a good start. Most Filipinos are also very practical and realistic. They overlook the value of meaning and satisfaction. They would choose a high-paying job rather than something they really want to do. Occupational deprivation is evident here as the person cannot do his valued occupation. And this is caused by a global problem: poverty. There are a lot of college students in the Philippines where they do not like the program they are in. An example would be a friend of mine, he wanted to study graphic design and cinematography; however, his parents disapproved and now, he is studying to get a degree in business management. As OTs, we know the concepts of occupational balance, occupational competence and other factors that affect a person's occupational engagement. I believe that we can and must help them compromise in the occupation they are in. We can help them feel competent in whatever they choose to do.

Disclaimer: I am not insinuating that parents are very controlling of their child's life and future.

Offline

#24 Wednesday 9th of November 2016 17:19

RichardIrvin
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

gvyrastorza wrote:

My mother always believed that a person's upbringing could be seen clearly by the way they eat, so I've been taught at a young age different ways to eat in different situations.

In the Philippines, or at least in the provinces, one of the usual ways to eat is simply using the hands. Whether it's rice, meat, or vegetable, we use our hands, often picking from a communal plate (or rather, banana leaf). Utensils aren't used as often as they are in the cities. Eating also tends to be faster, as you have only your hands to eat, meaning there is no portioning of food, and everyone must race to get their fill. Eating is much slower in the cities where the fork and spoon rule over porcelain or paper plates with well-portioned meals given to everyone. No competition for more food, and no need to dirty your hands to eat.

The fork and spoon, I must say, seem to be remnants of Spanish influence. I come from Basque descent, and my family quite enjoys Spanish cuisine. Much of the cuisine is saucy and pre-cut, so forks and spoons would seem perfect for them. I cannot say for certain if this is how things go in Spain, but from what I know of my family, this seems the case.

Having a bit of Chinese (and apparently, Japanese) blood, my family is also well-versed with using chopsticks. These are very simple yet difficult to master instruments, and even until now I struggle to use them. Because my East-Asian blood is very dilute, I doubt much of what we do is proper for chopsticks, but the vast difference in the way they are used in comparison to the standard fork and spoon just shows how different cultures are.

Finally, for those countries which do not often eat rice or similar foods, spoons are often lacking, replaced with knives which, I know, stems all the way back to Medieval times, possibly further back. I only know that knives are more obvious choices for cutlery in places where the primary source of carbohydrates was wheat (which is used for making bread, to clarify). Other than that, I cannot say much else about this.

Overall, culture and history, as well as geography, plant distribution, and so many other factors, affect the way people eat all over the globe. I have to apologize if anything I said is wrong; all of this information I've deduced from personal experience. But I think I've proven my point that eating, as basic a need as it is, varies so widely from place to place. And this hasn't even gone to accounting for all those individual cases where a person cannot eat normally for any reason at all.

Hello!

Your insights have surely piqued my interest. It is true that different cultures have different ways of eating. However, in our society, the Filipinos are "westernized." Filipinos like to copy American ways and abandon some of the Filipino traditions. It is a grievous misconception that has held the slowly-growing-Americano-urban society of the Philippines that eating with one's hands is unhygienic. I have seen it with my own eyes. A customer of a regular restaurant sat at the corner of the place by himself, he used his hands to eat and many of the other diners shot him dirty looks and took pictures of him (surely to post on social media). After a few moments, a waiter walked over and asked him to leave. He didn't even get to finish his meal.

How do you propose we address this problem as future OTs? Can we persuade the people of Manila, the capital of the Philippines, that eating with our hands is acceptable?

Offline

#25 Thursday 10th of November 2016 02:51

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hello Sophie! How are you? I like this post very much as I extremely agree to you about this. We, Filipinos, value cleanliness. It is in our culture to take a bath atleast once a day. And yes, we are known to make use of a tabo and timba while bathing. I can remember my elementary teacher asking us this question in class: What household item makes the Filipinos distinct, that when you see this, you'll know right away that there is a Filipino living there? Yes, your answer is right: tabo. smile

spvillarama@up.edu.ph wrote:

Filipinos put a high value on cleanliness that taking a bath at least once or twice every day has been such an important part of everyday life. This habit may be attributed to the hot and humid climate in our country and the abundance of water seeing as we are surrounded by large bodies of water. We usually take a bath in the morning before leaving for work and one again in the evening before going to sleep. For some Filipinos who claim to only take a bath once a day, chances are they take what we call a “half bath” which involves cleaning the face, armpits, private parts and feet before sleeping.

http://i65.tinypic.com/5a5rmx.jpgg
                                                                                  The Philippines' famous tabo and timba

Unlike other countries, many Filipino households do not have overhead showers that is why the plastic tabo, pronounced as TAH-boh is an almost indispensable fixture in the Filipino home. Although it is most commonly found in the provinces, it is also widely used in the cities. The tabo and the timba, generally a plastic pail with a metal handle filled with water are the traditional Filipino hygiene tools used to clean the toilet floor, to get water to flush the toilet, and most importantly, to get water for personal cleanliness: for washing hands, for shampooing, and for bathing the whole body.

Also, not all toilets in the Philippines have a flush, so the tabo and the timba are also widely used for anal cleansing. Many Filipinos actually prefer this practice rather than using toilet paper since believe it or not, it will make you feel much cleaner and refreshed than using toilet paper alone. Worry not since Filipinos thoroughly wash their hands after going to the toilet using water and soap.

Click the YouTube link below if you want to learn more about the unique Filipino toilet practice of using tabo and timba.

Filipino CR Tutorial by Mikey Bustos

Offline

Board footer