You are not logged in.

Announcement

Welcome to the Occupational Therapy International Online Network (OTION).

Our goal is to provide an online resource for the international occupational therapy community through this on-line forum.

You will have the opportunity to participate in discussion topics related to your practice area and interact with your international colleagues. A moderator, who will be a resource to the group, monitors each topic.

We look forward to your participation and contribution to international occupational therapy practice.

If you are new, please click here to register. If you have already registered, click here to login.


#26 Thursday 10th of November 2016 03:01

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi Sam! I just wanted to add a link to a song entitled "Harana" by Parokya ni Edgar. You may want to listen to this. This is a widely known song in the Philippines about serenading, and this is sung especially while courting smile https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=T18gvfU2x3Q and an English translation -->
lyricstranslate.com/en/harna-serenade.html

Sam Agura wrote:

Sam here~

One interesting I've seen in our culture that's pretty interesting is the courtship practices we have here in the Philippines. While we are already in the 21st century, most of our traditional courtship practices can still be seen in the rural areas and sometimes even in the big cities. While there are women who are okay with being the one to do the chasing after a guy, it is still preferred that it is the men who do the chasing after women.

One courtship practice that persists in some provinces in the country today is the "harana" or serenade where the man goes to the house of the woman with his friends to sing love songs to her in the hopes that they will be invited to the house and get an opportunity to express his intentions to the girl. Although it is seldom seen nowadays, it is still sometimes indulged in by the more old-fashioned menfolk. Since it is rather rare during these times, it elicits a lot of attention and gets a lot of brownie points for the man.

It is also a common practice to have a "tulay" or bridge, usually a close friend of the girl, whom the man approaches to ask for help in courting her.

It is also preferred by parents to have the men courting their daughters to come over to their house to visit and court, instead of doing it through text messages or going somewhere else. This is to ensure that the parents get to know who are interested in their daughters.

Ohhhh and I noticed someone posted a youtube link so I'll do the same: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WId8qkiEYw

Offline

#27 Thursday 10th of November 2016 03:13

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi Gale! I just want to emphasized that yes, Fiestas are celebrated in honor of a patron saint, but one you hear the word "Fiesta", food is the first one most Filipinos think of. In our province, one of my most awaited celebrations are Fiestas. In Fiestas, sumptuous and delicious foods are served. There is also kakanin or Native delicacies. Kakanin comes from the word kanin, meaning prepared rice. Kakanin or Native delicacies are integral part of the Filipino food culture. Uniquely Filipino, these are sweet munchies or sometimes desserts made from rice, sweet rice or root vegetables that are slow cooked and usually made with coconut or coconut milk. In every Fiesta, kakanin will always and will always be served.

As for your question, I believe that Fiestas in the Philippines should be still done and continued. It is one great way to get together and have reunions. It is also a way of establising camaraderie with neighbors, far-lived relatives, and friends.

etalas wrote:

Hi guys! In the Philippines, aside from Christmas, New Year, and birthdays, citizens are also celebrating FIESTAS!!! Fiestas are held on the birthday of the patron saint and we have lots of saints here in our country so every town and city has a fiesta of its own. I've just realized that fiestas could fall under the category of birthdays hehe smile Let's continue. Inside the churches, novenas and special prayers are to be spoken. But there's more! Fiestas are celebrated as lively as the people can!!! Parades full of efforts are always present. People joining the parades have extraordinary costumes, masks, make-ups, and head-dresses that were prepared couple of months before the fiesta. Combos (bands during fiestas) have this role of energizing the parade by loud sounds and hard beats. Fiestas are also considered a thanksgiving day that's why at homes, you would expect so much food and visitors from other towns.

Celebrating fiestas has its advantages and disadvantages. Any idea? Would you like to suggest any modification? Should we still continue it?

Offline

#28 Thursday 10th of November 2016 03:33

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi Sam! This is quite an interesting post for jeepneys are uniquely Filipinos. #OnlyInThePhilippines
I would just like to give some suggestions for modifications:
-Most of the jeepney drivers do not wear appropriate clothing when driving, some wear undershirt and shorts and slippers. I believe that for their safety, more appropriate and standard clothing should be worn, as most of them drive around whole day, may it be rain or shine.
-The no smoking policy in public transportations in this case should be more strictly implemented, and must start with the jeepney driver himself/herself.
-I favor the jeepneys having a toda or station where to start to lessen road congestion and heavy traffic. It is also for better designation of route.
-Even if it may be a nuisance to some passengers, jeepney drivers should strictly follow the proper loading and unloading places to ensure safety of passenger and to avoid building up of traffic.

These are some suggestions smile


sagacho wrote:

Hi I'm Sam G from the Philippines!

There are a lot of unique ways on how we do occupations here in the Philippines but I'll share with you one of the most common occupations I do - commuting! Here in the Philippines the most popular means of public transportation is the Jeepney. It is really popular because it has a relatively cheap fare and we have lot of it here.The idea of jeepneys here in the Philippines originally came from the US. There were a lot of military jeepneys left after the World War II and they were sold and given to the local Filipinos. Filipinos then started to modify it such as adding roofs and painting it with vibrant colors and due to its seating design that can accommodate many people the jeepney  became a common public transporting vehicle.


This is a picture of a military jeep during World War II
http://www.tourisminthephilippines.com/ … 2%2001.jpg

This is picture of a typical jeep here in the Philippines today
http://www.filipiknow.net/wp-content/up … ppines.jpg

Commuting is a really important occupation for us Filipinos, especially now that the traffic here is really really heavy and we are discouraged to bring our own private vehicles to go to school or to work. I have to admit that some of our public vehicles are not accessible to persons with disabilities. And this is one  of the many thoughts that I am bothered about when I am commuting. The jeepney is relatively crowded and it has a really low roof and a person with  physical disability can not take this means of transportation and a PWD has no choice but to take another means of transportation. Another famous public transportation we have is our rail transits. Our rail transits have a specific area for PWDs, senior citizens and pregnant women but based on my observation this doesn't make sense. Around hundreds of thousands of riders everyday and also considering the few number of operational trains we have  the rail transits are always congested  and the special area for the PWDs is also jammed you can't even make a space to breathe what more for a wheel chair or crutches. You'll actually feel like a sardine inside the train for a moment.

Commuting is already a part of every Filipino's life and I am looking forward that soon we'll have more accessible and more inclusive transportation for the PWD commuters. As a future Occupational Therapist I would love to handle clients that would like to  commute independently but I know this will be very very hard considering the system of our transportation here. I hope in the near future we can do something about this one step at a time. smile

Any commute stories you want to share guys? smile

Offline

#29 Thursday 10th of November 2016 03:43

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hello Ito! I agree with you. As Filipinos, most of us were taught in an early age to eat using our hands and fingers or "pagkakamay" as we call it. I believe that in doing so, one important ADL should be mastered at a young age, which is handwashing. Handwashing is not only done after eating, but also after eating. As a child, I was always told by my parents to wash my hands first before eating to avoid the food being contaminated and for health reasons. In "pagkakamay", fine motor skills were also practiced and improved as foods have different sizes, textures, and shapes. To eat efficiently, we manipulate our fingers to grasp and press together the food and put it into our mouths. smile

gvyrastorza wrote:

My mother always believed that a person's upbringing could be seen clearly by the way they eat, so I've been taught at a young age different ways to eat in different situations.

In the Philippines, or at least in the provinces, one of the usual ways to eat is simply using the hands. Whether it's rice, meat, or vegetable, we use our hands, often picking from a communal plate (or rather, banana leaf). Utensils aren't used as often as they are in the cities. Eating also tends to be faster, as you have only your hands to eat, meaning there is no portioning of food, and everyone must race to get their fill. Eating is much slower in the cities where the fork and spoon rule over porcelain or paper plates with well-portioned meals given to everyone. No competition for more food, and no need to dirty your hands to eat.

The fork and spoon, I must say, seem to be remnants of Spanish influence. I come from Basque descent, and my family quite enjoys Spanish cuisine. Much of the cuisine is saucy and pre-cut, so forks and spoons would seem perfect for them. I cannot say for certain if this is how things go in Spain, but from what I know of my family, this seems the case.

Having a bit of Chinese (and apparently, Japanese) blood, my family is also well-versed with using chopsticks. These are very simple yet difficult to master instruments, and even until now I struggle to use them. Because my East-Asian blood is very dilute, I doubt much of what we do is proper for chopsticks, but the vast difference in the way they are used in comparison to the standard fork and spoon just shows how different cultures are.

Finally, for those countries which do not often eat rice or similar foods, spoons are often lacking, replaced with knives which, I know, stems all the way back to Medieval times, possibly further back. I only know that knives are more obvious choices for cutlery in places where the primary source of carbohydrates was wheat (which is used for making bread, to clarify). Other than that, I cannot say much else about this.

Overall, culture and history, as well as geography, plant distribution, and so many other factors, affect the way people eat all over the globe. I have to apologize if anything I said is wrong; all of this information I've deduced from personal experience. But I think I've proven my point that eating, as basic a need as it is, varies so widely from place to place. And this hasn't even gone to accounting for all those individual cases where a person cannot eat normally for any reason at all.

Offline

#30 Thursday 10th of November 2016 03:54

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi Cathy! I believe that Filipinos being hospitable comes with Filipinos being unable to give criticism. Filipinos are very respectful and sensitive. For example, if one asked how's the taste of the food, a Filipino will answer that it tastes good even if he/she knows differently. If asked if a shirt looks good, a Filipino will answer yes even if he/she knows otherwise. We, Filipinos, do not want to hurt the feelings of others, may it be a friend, a family, or a stranger. A rare trait to us is being frank. And even in being frank means being honest, a lot of Filipinos still choose to be on the safe side, and will just use flowery words and will filter what will they say to avoid hurting other people.

Is this good or bad? smile any thoughts about this?

cetalastas wrote:

Hi! This is Cathy from the Philippines.

It has always been part of the Filipino culture to provide hospitality to everyone. Hospitality is the trait characterized by showing warmth and generosity towards visitors and guests no matter what nationality they have. Filipinos will provide the best food to the visitors and will assure that their guests will feel comfortable with their stay. This pleasant treatment is shown not only those who are affluent but also those who are the poorest in the country.

Based on the Philippine history, hospitality is already evident in Filipinos when they have shown cordial welcome to the Spaniards and other colonizers of the Philippines. Even though Filipinos, experienced a lot of suffering with the colonizers, their hospitality never faded away. With this. we could really see how Filipinos give importance to hospitality in which they don’t consider the nationality or the past that they have experienced.

Being hospitable is both a positive and negative trait. Positive because Filipinos exhibit friendly reception of guests and always assure that the guests are having a good time and happiness in their stay. However, it could be also negative. It is because sometimes Filipinos tend to spend lavishly just to provide the guest sumptuous meal even if sometimes the money that they have is just enough for their family’s needs.

These are some of the common treatment of Filipinos to guests:
-If you arrive at their home, they will ask you right away to enter and to make yourself feel comfortable.
-Filipinos will joyfully welcome you with big smiles on their faces.
-Filipinos will prepare a lot of food and will force you to eat.
-Filipinos will share a lot of stories during your stay at their place.
-At the end of your visit, they will ask you to come back and take home some foods.

Indeed, hospitality will always be a part of the Filipino culture.
Check this link to see a clipart that depicts hospitality of Filipinos- http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qqgmBvJl0us/U … actual.jpg

Offline

#31 Thursday 10th of November 2016 04:09

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Besides the use of "tabo" or pail for bathing and hygiene, use of "harana" or serenade while courting, having jeepneys that are uniquely Filipinos, celebrating fiestas and having "kakanin" or native delicacies, practicing "pagkakamay" or use of hands and fingers for eating, and avoiding criticizing, what are the other occupations or things that we, Filipinos, do differently?

Check this site out: www.livinginthephilippines.com/culture-and-people/philippine-culture/culture-and-traditions/415-filipino-culture-customs-and-traditions

This site presents the Filipino culture and the occupations in great detail, e.g. how and why it was done smile

Last edited by Maria Nicole Sombillo (Thursday 10th of November 2016 04:23)

Offline

#32 Thursday 10th of November 2016 04:45

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

As a Filipino, I also want to present a custom that goes on from generation to generation and that is unique to us. This is "pagmamano", asking for the hand of the elderly and putting it to one's forehead while bowing. This is done to ask for the elder's blessing. Almost involuntary and automatically done, when a Filipino sees an older person or relative e.g. parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, godparents, a Filipino raises his/her hand, says "Mano po" ("Your hand, please")  to accept the blessing. This custom is also usually done after religious activities like Mass or prayers. This is also done during Christmas time to godparents an in turn may receive monetary gifts or presents. This custom has its roots from Filipinos showing their value of respect. Another custom to show respect is adding "po" or "opo" when talking to the elderly, and addressing an older female as "ate" or sister, and an older male as "kuya" or brother.

Here are pictures of pagmamano: https://www.google.com.ph/search?q=pagm … wQ_AUIBygB

Last edited by Maria Nicole Sombillo (Thursday 10th of November 2016 04:47)

Offline

#33 Thursday 10th of November 2016 05:35

Byeul
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hello, everyone!
When Filipino families get together, one thing can't be missed out: FOOD! One of the highlights of a Filipino family get together is having lots of food to share, which can also be simply referred to as "kainan". A unique and fun way of doing so is having a boodle fight, where food is placed on long tables on top of banana leaves, and people use their hands to dig in. Boodle fight is usually done from a military perspective; but here in the Philippines, it's a very enjoyable and hearty way of bringing people together and enjoy the meal prepared. The variety of food depends on whatever the people want - from seafood to adding fresh fruits on the table. Personally, I enjoy eating in a boodle fight haha. Here in our townhouse, we often have dinners with our neighbors and sometimes, we do it in a boodle fight way.
Although eating from a boodle can be messy, nothing beats the fun the people have when they enjoy the food with their loved ones, especially with a happy tummy!

Here are a few photos to give you guys an idea on what it looks like. Hoping to hear more from everyone!
- Byeul

https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=ht … mrc&uact=8
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=ht … mrc&uact=8
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=ht … mrc&uact=8

Offline

#34 Thursday 10th of November 2016 05:39

Byeul
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi, Sophia!
The tabo is really one of the unique Filipino household items. More often than not, relatives from abroad ask their relatives from the Philippines to send them one haha. Culture really does play a very significant role on people's daily routines, especially since in our country where hygiene is an utmost priority. Being neat and tidy is essential for us everyday. Thanks for posting a photo so it's easier for our friends from abroad to visualize it!
- Byeul

spvillarama@up.edu.ph wrote:

Filipinos put a high value on cleanliness that taking a bath at least once or twice every day has been such an important part of everyday life. This habit may be attributed to the hot and humid climate in our country and the abundance of water seeing as we are surrounded by large bodies of water. We usually take a bath in the morning before leaving for work and one again in the evening before going to sleep. For some Filipinos who claim to only take a bath once a day, chances are they take what we call a “half bath” which involves cleaning the face, armpits, private parts and feet before sleeping.

http://i65.tinypic.com/5a5rmx.jpgg
                                                                                  The Philippines' famous tabo and timba

Unlike other countries, many Filipino households do not have overhead showers that is why the plastic tabo, pronounced as TAH-boh is an almost indispensable fixture in the Filipino home. Although it is most commonly found in the provinces, it is also widely used in the cities. The tabo and the timba, generally a plastic pail with a metal handle filled with water are the traditional Filipino hygiene tools used to clean the toilet floor, to get water to flush the toilet, and most importantly, to get water for personal cleanliness: for washing hands, for shampooing, and for bathing the whole body.

Also, not all toilets in the Philippines have a flush, so the tabo and the timba are also widely used for anal cleansing. Many Filipinos actually prefer this practice rather than using toilet paper since believe it or not, it will make you feel much cleaner and refreshed than using toilet paper alone. Worry not since Filipinos thoroughly wash their hands after going to the toilet using water and soap.

Click the YouTube link below if you want to learn more about the unique Filipino toilet practice of using tabo and timba.

Filipino CR Tutorial by Mikey Bustos

Last edited by Byeul (Thursday 10th of November 2016 05:43)

Offline

#35 Thursday 10th of November 2016 05:42

Byeul
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi, Chewy!
I agree, pagmamano is one of the customs that show Filipino respect to the elders. In some families, the kids even automatically say "mano po" to the elderly in the house at around 6pm, if I'm not mistaken. And a proof of how significant of it in our culture is even as babies, pagmamano is already demonstrated to them to instill the value of respect for the elderly.
- Byeul

Maria Nicole Sombillo wrote:

As a Filipino, I also want to present a custom that goes on from generation to generation and that is unique to us. This is "pagmamano", asking for the hand of the elderly and putting it to one's forehead while bowing. This is done to ask for the elder's blessing. Almost involuntary and automatically done, when a Filipino sees an older person or relative e.g. parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, godparents, a Filipino raises his/her hand, says "Mano po" ("Your hand, please")  to accept the blessing. This custom is also usually done after religious activities like Mass or prayers. This is also done during Christmas time to godparents an in turn may receive monetary gifts or presents. This custom has its roots from Filipinos showing their value of respect. Another custom to show respect is adding "po" or "opo" when talking to the elderly, and addressing an older female as "ate" or sister, and an older male as "kuya" or brother.

Here are pictures of pagmamano: https://www.google.com.ph/search?q=pagm … wQ_AUIBygB

Offline

#36 Thursday 10th of November 2016 05:47

Byeul
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi, Chewy and Sam!
I agree that jeepney drivers should follow the appropriate uniform and not just wear them whenever they see traffic enforcers on the road. As someone who uses the jeepney as a public transportation, I also agree that the drivers shouldn't smoke. There were many incidents wherein I experienced this, and it wasn't just me who was irritated but the other passangers as well. It's especially more difficult to breathe when you have colds or asthma, and the cigarette smoke adds up to the pollution you smell from being in an open vehicle. Hopefully improvements will be made soon so people will have better public transportation experience. smile
- Byeul

Maria Nicole Sombillo wrote:

Hi Sam! This is quite an interesting post for jeepneys are uniquely Filipinos. #OnlyInThePhilippines
I would just like to give some suggestions for modifications:
-Most of the jeepney drivers do not wear appropriate clothing when driving, some wear undershirt and shorts and slippers. I believe that for their safety, more appropriate and standard clothing should be worn, as most of them drive around whole day, may it be rain or shine.
-The no smoking policy in public transportations in this case should be more strictly implemented, and must start with the jeepney driver himself/herself.
-I favor the jeepneys having a toda or station where to start to lessen road congestion and heavy traffic. It is also for better designation of route.
-Even if it may be a nuisance to some passengers, jeepney drivers should strictly follow the proper loading and unloading places to ensure safety of passenger and to avoid building up of traffic.

These are some suggestions smile


sagacho wrote:

Hi I'm Sam G from the Philippines!

There are a lot of unique ways on how we do occupations here in the Philippines but I'll share with you one of the most common occupations I do - commuting! Here in the Philippines the most popular means of public transportation is the Jeepney. It is really popular because it has a relatively cheap fare and we have lot of it here.The idea of jeepneys here in the Philippines originally came from the US. There were a lot of military jeepneys left after the World War II and they were sold and given to the local Filipinos. Filipinos then started to modify it such as adding roofs and painting it with vibrant colors and due to its seating design that can accommodate many people the jeepney  became a common public transporting vehicle.


This is a picture of a military jeep during World War II
http://www.tourisminthephilippines.com/ … 2%2001.jpg

This is picture of a typical jeep here in the Philippines today
http://www.filipiknow.net/wp-content/up … ppines.jpg

Commuting is a really important occupation for us Filipinos, especially now that the traffic here is really really heavy and we are discouraged to bring our own private vehicles to go to school or to work. I have to admit that some of our public vehicles are not accessible to persons with disabilities. And this is one  of the many thoughts that I am bothered about when I am commuting. The jeepney is relatively crowded and it has a really low roof and a person with  physical disability can not take this means of transportation and a PWD has no choice but to take another means of transportation. Another famous public transportation we have is our rail transits. Our rail transits have a specific area for PWDs, senior citizens and pregnant women but based on my observation this doesn't make sense. Around hundreds of thousands of riders everyday and also considering the few number of operational trains we have  the rail transits are always congested  and the special area for the PWDs is also jammed you can't even make a space to breathe what more for a wheel chair or crutches. You'll actually feel like a sardine inside the train for a moment.

Commuting is already a part of every Filipino's life and I am looking forward that soon we'll have more accessible and more inclusive transportation for the PWD commuters. As a future Occupational Therapist I would love to handle clients that would like to  commute independently but I know this will be very very hard considering the system of our transportation here. I hope in the near future we can do something about this one step at a time. smile

Any commute stories you want to share guys? smile

Offline

#37 Friday 11th of November 2016 15:53

pgcruz4
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

HI everyone! It’s me Phoebe 

What I admire most about my fellow countrymen is their unique character.
For example, Filipinos are still able to smile despite the struggles and problems they face every day.  It is a contrast to what they are expected to show and it is what sets them apart from others. For me, Filipinos tend to be optimistic. They value happiness so much that they can find joy even from the smallest things. I think it’s really important that you enjoy whatever your occupation is, with such, one can attain fulfillment in their lives.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGOPXkPrSGk

Through hardships, they still ought to help each other a lot, may it be a loved one or a complete stranger.  This is what they call being “makabayan”. They set aside their desires just so they can help other people. This is why I have great respect for OFW workers. My father was once an engineer who travelled to different countries to work. I still remember the times when my mother would set a time schedule every night just so we can talk to our dad. I was once part of the many Filipino families left by one to work in abroad who would always patiently anticipate the return of their loved one. With the fact that Filipinos are optimistic and makabayan, it is also common to us that instead of just crying through the phone, they usually ask for “pasalubong”. And for me, engaging in occupations isn’t only satisfying oneself. Rather, it is better to engage in occupations that would give purpose to other people as well. As Filipinos, they greatly give importance to this practice.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_9fQEqZCWs

Lastly, what I like the most about our culture is our respect and great priority with the family. The family members are like puzzle pieces that are meant to be together and despite school, work any other distracting things; they would still yearn to get “home”.
Bonding with my family is one of my greatest occupations, may it be watching movies or just simply eating a meal together. We are eight in the family, and it is common for us to not be present in our house at the same time. One of my siblings even work in the province for four days a week and we barely spend time together because of our different, busy schedules. This is why whenever we have spare time, especially in holidays like Christmas, we usually dismiss the thought of going out with friends and instead, we stay home to spend our time together. Just like in a typical Filipino family, we also do things with utmost respect to what our elders want or to meet their expectations. Parent’s opinions matter the most that we almost always ask for permission from them. Being in this interdependence is not that bad for me. Personally, it is more of a guide so I can stop myself from doing things recklessly. Still, Filipino parents do not restrict you from having your freedom. Family traditions vary immensely that the amount of strictness varies as well. In my case, our parents’ are not that strict.

“My Family is like my occupations, they give meaning to my life.”

(Just to clear things out, I actually did not mention any tools or practices that are exclusive to our culture but I’d pointed out traits and characters of my fellowmen that I know are evident in every practices they do. I think it’s important that these are also mentioned so I can share what they usually feel or what values they usually hold in doing various occupations.)

Last edited by pgcruz4 (Friday 11th of November 2016 15:56)


@Pbpandaa

Offline

#38 Friday 11th of November 2016 16:15

K.V.Rivera
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

How’s it going?

I know that some people have already spoken about this, the Filipinos have a very interdependent culture. We value our family a lot and we put them and their advice at the top of our lists. We Filipinos also respect our elders greatly. The “mano” is something that we do quite frequently. We take the hand of the elder and we take it to our foreheads as a sign of respect. This actually came from our time under the Spanish rule, where mano translates to hand and po is a word we use as a sign of respect in referring to an elder person, so this roughly translates to ‘your hand please.’ This gesture is seen as the younger person accepting the blessing of wisdom from the elderly. Now while there is no age limit to who you show this gesture to, it is usually a difference of two generations (so a grandson to his grandparents) or when you meet an older family member during a family get together. This really shows how we Filipinos value the wisdom that an older generation can impart on us. My grandfather always used to say that “While they can teach you a lot in school, never forget the value of experience, and we older people really do have a lot of it (rough English translation of what he actually said)”.

Another common practice of Filipino families is the bonding time during a Sunday. The Philippines is a primarily catholic country, where around 80% of the population say that they are catholic (2010 survey). This is then no surprise that families take time out of their week during Sundays to go to church. What strikes me about this is that at the end of the mass, the priest would normally say to ‘have a great day with your families’. While this can be seen as them normally preaching about having a great time with your loved ones, it can also be seen as a sign that families typically spend the rest of the Sunday with each other. While a lot of families can boast that they spend dinner together and that is also a really common practice here, some families can’t do that whether it be because of time constraints with work or school. But it seems that even with all these hindrances, a Filipino family can find the time to give up Sunday for God and for their family.

There are many more and I hope that you get to read some of them from the different perspective of everyone in this thread. I would also like to read more about some practices from other countries, so don’t be afraid and post now smile

-Keith

Offline

#39 Friday 11th of November 2016 16:30

K.V.Rivera
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

etalas wrote:

Hi guys! In the Philippines, aside from Christmas, New Year, and birthdays, citizens are also celebrating FIESTAS!!! Fiestas are held on the birthday of the patron saint and we have lots of saints here in our country so every town and city has a fiesta of its own. I've just realized that fiestas could fall under the category of birthdays hehe smile Let's continue. Inside the churches, novenas and special prayers are to be spoken. But there's more! Fiestas are celebrated as lively as the people can!!! Parades full of efforts are always present. People joining the parades have extraordinary costumes, masks, make-ups, and head-dresses that were prepared couple of months before the fiesta. Combos (bands during fiestas) have this role of energizing the parade by loud sounds and hard beats. Fiestas are also considered a thanksgiving day that's why at homes, you would expect so much food and visitors from other towns.

Celebrating fiestas has its advantages and disadvantages. Any idea? Would you like to suggest any modification? Should we still continue it?


Hi Gale!

I think that fiestas should be continued. It seems that with the busy schedules of everyone in the family, we sometimes take forget to take into consideration the need for a break. What better way than to spend it with fun and laughter by the entire family. With the fast pace of the city lifestyle, its nice to have a break, to spend a day playing games and eating food smile. It also gives us a chance to reconnect with our family members. The fiestas become a chance for us to get to talk with our family members which we may not have had the chance to speak with for a while. The only thing that seems to bug me after a huge party like this is the mess we make when we leave. That is the only gripe I have with the fiesta as we seem to forget the trash we leave when we finish. All the banners and the wrappers and plastic bags would be left on the street at the end. I think that this is a mentality among us Filipinos that we should change, the idea that 'someone' will do it for us. When we don't do and act on the change that we want, why do we expect others to do the change for us? Hope to hear your thoughts on this. smile

Offline

#40 Friday 11th of November 2016 16:53

K.V.Rivera
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

kyla.rocafort wrote:

When asked to reminisce memories, a typical Filipino would automatically drift back to his childhood memories of playing indoors and outdoors. It is through play that Filipino children are first exposed to the world. Play is how they learn and establish social relationships.

Filipino games require only simple materials that can easily be found at one’s house. Some games are imitations of what adults do. These include lutu-lutuan and bahay-bahayan which the girls loved playing. Trumpo or top is a popular game to boys. The trumpo resembles the shape of a cone and is made up of wood from guava branches. Players would let their trumpo spin on its iron nail in the middle of a drawn circle, and whoever trumpo spins the longest would be declared the winner.

Tumbang preso (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b1oK0Uh4a24), piko (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_mz04faqsY), patintero (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_jH_nir868), and luksong baka (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cic4ILX07hg) are just some examples of outdoor Filipino games. One can see children playing in an open space in their barrio at around 4pm as this is the habitually established time for outdoor games because the sun is not at its peak anymore. These type of games develop the child’s gross motor skills as you can see children running around, hopping and jumping.

Filipino indoor games include sungka, siklot and nanay-tatay. Sungka and siklot (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QFWpYS_pvM) uses shells or pebbles. These games develop one’s cognitive skills. Nanay-tatay also plays a role in developing cognitive skills but its developmental manifestation is seen in the hand-eye coordination. To know how nanay-tatay is played, watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZarBmqbnMRI.

Both Filipino indoor and outdoor games are easy to play. Some games can be played individually but most games require participation from other people. Filipino games play a major role in the culture as this is where children learn through experience. Playing for Filipino children enables them to be flexible, creative, resourceful and active.



Hi Kyla!

I do agree that the Filipino game are really important to our culture. I have lots of fond memories playing with my friends on the streets, no matter how dangerous this may seem, and this was the time when I first got to make friends. It really did help me to grow as a person and this became a foundation for my social skills in the future. It seems really sad that this is slowly becoming an old practice. With the rise of electronics comes the fall of the need to go outside to play. While I believe that electronics also give rise to new opportunities to play with others, its really sad that something so evident in our culture would slowly fade away. I hope that this practice is one that many more generations experience.

Offline

#41 Saturday 12th of November 2016 06:58

avaguila1
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

I’ve never learned to ride a bike without the training wheels. I can remember that I was very enthusiastic back then to learn how to ride the bike because I saw how my brother enjoyed riding one. I wasn’t able to learn because my grandmother discouraged me not to. She has a belief that if a girl rides a bike, she may lose her virginity accidentally. Cultural beliefs and influences limit us to engage in occupations that we want and these affect how we experience our environment. I believe that there are occupations that should not be gender-specific. We must allow everyone to experience all the occupations he/she wants without looking into his/her gender.

Looking in my culture and environment now that I am in college, it is very obvious that it is very different from my culture and environment when I was in high school. Before, I usually have a 20-30 minute travel time from our house to our school via riding a service jeep, but now, I just walk to go to school. Now, I don’t get to see my parents and my brother every day since I now live in Manila. These brought a lot of changes in my lifestyle and my priorities. It was very difficult adjusting at first since it was not the routine or the lifestyle I was used to. Even now, it is still very challenging for me to eat three meals a day since my schedule changed and this affects my health and how I deal with my other occupations for the day.


Filipinos are known to be very hospitable. This is the trait that I believe is common to most of our ‘kababayans’. As Filipinos, whenever we have guests, we make sure that they don’t get left out. We encouraged them to join in our festivals and other occupations as well. We actually treat them like there are members of our family. 
To know more about Filipino hospitality, here is an article that talks about it: https://everything-filipino.com/filipin … 4667968750


-Alyssa Aguila

Offline

#42 Saturday 12th of November 2016 07:18

avaguila1
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Byeul wrote:

Hello, everyone!
When Filipino families get together, one thing can't be missed out: FOOD! One of the highlights of a Filipino family get together is having lots of food to share, which can also be simply referred to as "kainan". A unique and fun way of doing so is having a boodle fight, where food is placed on long tables on top of banana leaves, and people use their hands to dig in. Boodle fight is usually done from a military perspective; but here in the Philippines, it's a very enjoyable and hearty way of bringing people together and enjoy the meal prepared. The variety of food depends on whatever the people want - from seafood to adding fresh fruits on the table. Personally, I enjoy eating in a boodle fight haha. Here in our townhouse, we often have dinners with our neighbors and sometimes, we do it in a boodle fight way.
Although eating from a boodle can be messy, nothing beats the fun the people have when they enjoy the food with their loved ones, especially with a happy tummy!

Here are a few photos to give you guys an idea on what it looks like. Hoping to hear more from everyone!
- Byeul

https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=ht … mrc&uact=8
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=ht … mrc&uact=8
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=ht … mrc&uact=8

Hello Byeul!
Food is what brings Filipinos together! Aside from being very hospitable, we are also known to be very fond of eating. I also believe that by eating together, it is how relationship is build or how a relationship can be strengthened too. This made me missed our family reunions and celebrations since all of us really love eating!

-Alyssa

Offline

#43 Saturday 12th of November 2016 07:48

avaguila1
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

K.V.Rivera wrote:

How’s it going?

I know that some people have already spoken about this, the Filipinos have a very interdependent culture. We value our family a lot and we put them and their advice at the top of our lists. We Filipinos also respect our elders greatly. The “mano” is something that we do quite frequently. We take the hand of the elder and we take it to our foreheads as a sign of respect. This actually came from our time under the Spanish rule, where mano translates to hand and po is a word we use as a sign of respect in referring to an elder person, so this roughly translates to ‘your hand please.’ This gesture is seen as the younger person accepting the blessing of wisdom from the elderly. Now while there is no age limit to who you show this gesture to, it is usually a difference of two generations (so a grandson to his grandparents) or when you meet an older family member during a family get together. This really shows how we Filipinos value the wisdom that an older generation can impart on us. My grandfather always used to say that “While they can teach you a lot in school, never forget the value of experience, and we older people really do have a lot of it (rough English translation of what he actually said)”.

Another common practice of Filipino families is the bonding time during a Sunday. The Philippines is a primarily catholic country, where around 80% of the population say that they are catholic (2010 survey). This is then no surprise that families take time out of their week during Sundays to go to church. What strikes me about this is that at the end of the mass, the priest would normally say to ‘have a great day with your families’. While this can be seen as them normally preaching about having a great time with your loved ones, it can also be seen as a sign that families typically spend the rest of the Sunday with each other. While a lot of families can boast that they spend dinner together and that is also a really common practice here, some families can’t do that whether it be because of time constraints with work or school. But it seems that even with all these hindrances, a Filipino family can find the time to give up Sunday for God and for their family.

There are many more and I hope that you get to read some of them from the different perspective of everyone in this thread. I would also like to read more about some practices from other countries, so don’t be afraid and post now smile

-Keith

Hi Keith!
I agree with you that the Filipino culture is very interdependent. For most of us, our family always comes first and we really do respect our elderly. This is also evident in the fact that Filipinos with their extended family members usually live in one house. What your grandfather said really explains the importance of listening to our elderly. Interdependence is good but don't you think it has its negative effects too? I think it somehow hinders Filipinos to practice independence and this somehow limits us in doing other occupations. What do you think? smile

-Alyssa

Offline

#44 Saturday 12th of November 2016 08:01

avaguila1
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Maria Nicole Sombillo wrote:

As a Filipino, I also want to present a custom that goes on from generation to generation and that is unique to us. This is "pagmamano", asking for the hand of the elderly and putting it to one's forehead while bowing. This is done to ask for the elder's blessing. Almost involuntary and automatically done, when a Filipino sees an older person or relative e.g. parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, godparents, a Filipino raises his/her hand, says "Mano po" ("Your hand, please")  to accept the blessing. This custom is also usually done after religious activities like Mass or prayers. This is also done during Christmas time to godparents an in turn may receive monetary gifts or presents. This custom has its roots from Filipinos showing their value of respect. Another custom to show respect is adding "po" or "opo" when talking to the elderly, and addressing an older female as "ate" or sister, and an older male as "kuya" or brother.

Here are pictures of pagmamano: https://www.google.com.ph/search?q=pagm … wQ_AUIBygB

Hi Chewy!
I learned before that through "pagmamano", the elderly passes to the person asking for it his/her wisdom and blessings. This doesn't necessarily mean that tehe blessings have to be gifts. Actually, I like to think of "pagmamano" as a way for us to ask the people older than us for guidance and help as we go through different challenges in our life. Also, I believe that adding "opo" and "po" when we speak characterizes us as Filipinos. Correct me if I am wrong but I think there are no other culture that uses "po" and opo" in their speech as a sign of respect to the elderly. smile

-Alyssa

Offline

#45 Saturday 12th of November 2016 13:16

Ivanna Co
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

pdregalario wrote:
kyla.rocafort wrote:
Ivanna Co wrote:

Ivanna here!

In the Filipino culture, girls sometimes hold "debut" or coming-of-age celebrations to celebrate their legality. Guest count may range from around 60 to 500. The debutante wears a formal dress, sometimes even dresses. Guests are expected to wear semi-formal or formal, depending on what is stated by the debutante/invitation. Typical programs involve the cutting of the birthday cake, the 18 Roses (closest male friends and relatives wherein they dance with the debutante), and the 18 Candles (closest female friends and relatives wherein they speak of their wishes and for the debutante), and the debutante's thanksgiving speech. In some debuts, there are additional programs such as 18 Treasures (where they present the debutante with a gift), 18 Blue Bills (where they each give the debutante Php1000), and/or 18 Songs (where they sing to the debutante).  Photo booths, extravagant decorations, and drinks (be it alcoholic or not) are a regular in debuts. Of course, food is a staple as is in any Filipino party.

On the other hand, boys do not have a clear line of becoming a man. Some consider circumcision as the mark, while others say being able to hold down alcoholic beverages. Some merely say that a boy is considered a man once he turns 18, the age of legality here in the Philippines.

How does your culture celebrate coming-of-age?


Hi, Inee! I never really wanted to celebrate my coming-of-age because first I don't like feeling a year older and second, I don't want to be the center of attention in the party. This is why my mom, together with my creative aunt, planned a surprise debut party for me. They disguised it as a wedding, and I was excited back then because I love being part of the wedding entourage. It was a big surprise for me when I arrived in the venue as I saw my face all over the place! Yes, I had those 18 roses, 18 shots, 18 butterflies and many more. I had worn several gowns as well (good thing my mom has an eye for sizes!). I really feel special that night and teary as well when I got the chance to dance with my father, my grandfather and my two younger brothers. I never really imagined it to be so magical and fun. Indeed, it was one of the enchanted nights of my life. And I'm really grateful that my mom secretly planned that party.

I have a brother who's going to turn 18 next year. I think it's really not customary to plan celebration as big as the girls because based on what I learned from Humanities 1, debuts are held to show that the daughter in the family is already open to entertain suitors and engage in more intimate relationships. It marks the start of the adult life for the girl.

I agree with Kyla. I, too, was against the whole idea of a grand debut when I turned 18. Personally, I disliked being in a position where a room of people will be forced to turn their attention to me. And the entire ordeal seemed too bothersome in my opinion. Having attended a few grand celebration of debuts, I suppose there is a certain charm to it. I especially like the idea of being all dolled up and wearing fancy dresses and thinking up of themes for a debut. And it was always touching to see and hear the love and care people showed the debutant.

I still find it unfair, however, that only women are celebrated on their 18th birthday. EQUALITY, I say! But I suppose old habits die hard and you can't really teach an old dog new tricks (especially one as old as the Philippines).

Hi Kyla and Paulyn!

As Kyla said, debuts are traditionally held to announce to the public that the daughter is of age to be married. Nowadays, however, this does not seem to be the case. Debuts are held as this is a popular way to celebrate the coming-of-age of a woman. Ironically, parents sometimes stress the fact that the debutante is not allowed to entertain a suitor yet. However, debuts certainly are a memorable night for the debutante.

I agree with Paulyn that men should also be able to celebrate their 18th birthdays in that fashion. However, as society views debuts as a feminine occupation, boys are not given the choice to have one.

Offline

#46 Saturday 12th of November 2016 16:27

Byeul
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hello again! smile

Another thing that characterizes Filipinos is how we celebrate Christmas. We probably have one of the biggest and longest celebration every year. As soon as the -ber months start, Christmas decors are seen on display and are being sold in the malls. Personally, I always look forward to the themes of the designs (most especially in malls). The season never fails to bring out Filipinos' creativity, especially with huge Christmas trees in the center of spacious places. Another unique Filipino tradition is hanging the "parol" on our houses. The parol is a star that lights up. This is a lantern, so to speak. Various lantern competitions are held all over the country - from building the biggest or brightest or most artistic or constructing it from recyclable materials.
It's a must for families and extended relatives to get together during the holidays, to exchange gifts, catch up on stories and of course, the famous noche buena. Noche buena is how Filipinos term the get together for the food on Christmas Eve. Some famous noche buena dishes are lechon (roasted pig) and kesong puti (a type of cheese famous in the country).

Here are a few pictures of the parol to give you guys an idea.
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=ht … mrc&uact=8
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=ht … mrc&uact=8
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=ht … mrc&uact=8

Offline

#47 Saturday 12th of November 2016 16:32

KawJemilyn
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hey Sam! This is an interesting topic indeed! I'm gonna share and compare Chinese kind of courting to Filipino culture courtship since I am a Filipino-Chinese.

I remembered my mom told me about how she and my father met. My Filipino-Chinese father is born and raised here in Manila while my mother is a pure Chinese born and raised in China; they have an age gap of 7 wherein my father is older. On their mid-20s, my father followed my grandfather back to their hometown to do some work. With their ages, they are being "haunted" by matchmakers in the town. A matchmaker from my father's neighborhood went to my maternal grandparents' house to make ties. They were introduced to each other for months and finally, everything is settled. My father courted my mom with the old-fashioned way (i.e., asking permissions for dating, bringing gifts of sincerity to the maternal house), married her and brought her back to the Philippines.

Actually, what he did is not really acceptable for my maternal great grandmother until now, she thinks that Chinese must marry Chinese and must stay in China. (traditional way of thinking)When I go visit her in China, she would always remind me to marry a man of the same culture. In college, I just discovered that the term for this traditional way of thinking is 'great wall', resembling to the Great Wall of China which borders the China from invaders of other cultures.

Here in the Philippines, diversity is not a problem since early Filipino times; this is one of the difference between Filipino and Chinese cultures regarding courtship and relationship.

The similarities between Filipino and Chinese courtship are the formality and age. People must get married within the appropriate age gap or they would be judged by the people around them, and it doesn't matter whether how far their age gap were.

I hope that I will not be tied with this traditional culture since as you mentioned, we're already in the 21st century. smile

What do you think?

Jem


Sam Agura wrote:

Sam here~

One interesting I've seen in our culture that's pretty interesting is the courtship practices we have here in the Philippines. While we are already in the 21st century, most of our traditional courtship practices can still be seen in the rural areas and sometimes even in the big cities. While there are women who are okay with being the one to do the chasing after a guy, it is still preferred that it is the men who do the chasing after women.

One courtship practice that persists in some provinces in the country today is the "harana" or serenade where the man goes to the house of the woman with his friends to sing love songs to her in the hopes that they will be invited to the house and get an opportunity to express his intentions to the girl. Although it is seldom seen nowadays, it is still sometimes indulged in by the more old-fashioned menfolk. Since it is rather rare during these times, it elicits a lot of attention and gets a lot of brownie points for the man.

It is also a common practice to have a "tulay" or bridge, usually a close friend of the girl, whom the man approaches to ask for help in courting her.

It is also preferred by parents to have the men courting their daughters to come over to their house to visit and court, instead of doing it through text messages or going somewhere else. This is to ensure that the parents get to know who are interested in their daughters.

Ohhhh and I noticed someone posted a youtube link so I'll do the same: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WId8qkiEYw

Last edited by KawJemilyn (Saturday 12th of November 2016 16:33)

Offline

#48 Saturday 12th of November 2016 16:55

KawJemilyn
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hey Aly and Chewy! Since being born and raised here in the Philippines, I was also taught by my father to "mano" to my elderly relatives to show respect. I think it is a nice tradition of us since this is what we have passed from generations to generations as a gentle reminder of being respectful to elders. In the Chinese culture, we have the tradition of "bowing" to the elders when we greet them and this must be done at 45⁰ trunk flexion (similar with Japanese culture). It is the Chinese way of respect but it is not really manifested in the modern Chinese society unless it is mandatory in school.

In Chinese culture, we 'bow' three times at the image or monument of deceased characters (e.g., elder family member/ relative who are deceased, Confucius, etc.) as a sign of respect to them and to remember their good deeds and to call to their guidance.

When I perform in various Filipino-Chinese events, I always make sure to 'bow' once before or after as respect to the everyone present in the venue; moreover, when I get to see my relatives in China after a long time, I do the "mano" to them to show respect and ask for guidance. They might not get the meaning of me doing it at first, but they realized the beauty of the simple gesture after my father explained to them.

About "po" and "opo" mentioned by Alyssa: With what I know from friends in different parts of the world, they don't have their "po" and "opo" in their languages. They might not understand the use of these two powerful words but I appreciate its beauty when I include it in a sentence. In our language, there is a gap between sentences with "po" and "opo" and sentences without; removing "po" and "opo" is like changing from peaceful mood to a more negative and unappreciated tone.

Thank you for an awesome topic!

Jem

avaguila1 wrote:
Maria Nicole Sombillo wrote:

As a Filipino, I also want to present a custom that goes on from generation to generation and that is unique to us. This is "pagmamano", asking for the hand of the elderly and putting it to one's forehead while bowing. This is done to ask for the elder's blessing. Almost involuntary and automatically done, when a Filipino sees an older person or relative e.g. parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, godparents, a Filipino raises his/her hand, says "Mano po" ("Your hand, please")  to accept the blessing. This custom is also usually done after religious activities like Mass or prayers. This is also done during Christmas time to godparents an in turn may receive monetary gifts or presents. This custom has its roots from Filipinos showing their value of respect. Another custom to show respect is adding "po" or "opo" when talking to the elderly, and addressing an older female as "ate" or sister, and an older male as "kuya" or brother.

Here are pictures of pagmamano: https://www.google.com.ph/search?q=pagm … wQ_AUIBygB

Hi Chewy!
I learned before that through "pagmamano", the elderly passes to the person asking for it his/her wisdom and blessings. This doesn't necessarily mean that tehe blessings have to be gifts. Actually, I like to think of "pagmamano" as a way for us to ask the people older than us for guidance and help as we go through different challenges in our life. Also, I believe that adding "opo" and "po" when we speak characterizes us as Filipinos. Correct me if I am wrong but I think there are no other culture that uses "po" and opo" in their speech as a sign of respect to the elderly. smile

-Alyssa

Offline

#49 Saturday 12th of November 2016 18:16

KawJemilyn
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hello there!

I would like to share and compare about the daily lifestyles of retired grandparents (and even great grandparents) among Filipino and Chinese communities.

In Asian countries like Philippines and China, we highly appreciate the presence of our elders inside our homes, as such, we are very proud if there are more than 2 or 3 generations living under a roof. The presence of elders are blessings to us from above and we always thank God for their good health and happiness.

Regarding their lifestyle, Filipino and Chinese elders share common ADLs and IADLs such as care of their grandchildren at home especially when the parents are absent, communicating in the community, having their own personal household possessions and pass these onto their later generations when they leave. Some elders can still do their own financial management, maintain their health with the help of the family members and mobilizing in the community independently. Aside from typical occupations such as helping in maintaining the cleanliness and order in the house, going to the market to buy food supplies for the family and spoiling their grand children, I have discovered some differences in their leisure.

In traditional Filipino communities, leisure activities of the elderly mainly rely on what the family can provide for him/her; they prefer spending most of their quality time with their family members than going out and socializing with new friends. Grandparents spend time doing gardening works, playing and studying with their "apo-s" (grandchildren) , handy works such as hardware for grandfathers and housework such as cooking, knitting, sewing and making decorative house furniture for grandmothers. A word that can describe their quality time is 'calm'. They make themselves productive by doing these quiet tasks.

On the other hand, in the Chinese communities, grandparents are encouraged to go outside and socialize with other people aside from family members. Most of the leisure activities outside their homes boost good health and good socialization. As I went to China for some times to visit my maternal grandmother, she told me that she goes to a government funded-geriatric school where they sing in chorale, dance, and go travel together to different parts of China; she always say that she feels productive because she does occupations at home and outside. My grandmother manages household chores at home with the help of my uncle's wife.

Some activities that are manifested at plazas and parks are: playing chess in the morning (to sustain or restore mental functions), writing calligraphy using large versions of calligraphy brushes (to maintain muscle strength mainly from Upper Extremity), doing tai chi exercises and zumba (aerobic exercises to stimulate good body functions). Some grandparents can even do independent calligraphy writing with both hands at the same time. (trained: bilateral integration) While maintaining health and wellness, they get to interact with the people they meet in the parks and plazas thus, encouraging good social interaction skills and psychosocial health.

Some of these activities are now highly encouraged in different cultures (such as zumba) as well. Attached are some photos of the leisure activities mentioned and a photo of Filipino grandparents enjoying companionship. Another attachment is a video of a grandson who dances gracefully with the grandmothers in a plaza dance activity: Cute Toddler Dancing With The Grandmas--Video

Pinoy grandparents
Plaza Dance
Chess
Tai Chi
Bilateral Calligraphy

(Images from Google Images)


Hope you enjoy my post! Feel free to comment! smile

Jem

Last edited by KawJemilyn (Saturday 12th of November 2016 18:19)

Offline

#50 Monday 14th of November 2016 11:59

Franzes Dizon
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi, Franzes again here!

Filipinos exert extra effort when it comes to famiky gatherings like reunions, fiestas and other special occasions. At some provinces, they even let their neighbors in and eat the food they have prepared, and I guess its what makes us hospitable enough to help other people. OTs need to be hospitable, in order to help people who have become shy and scared of admitting what they need from the professionals. Our culture has shaped us to be concerned with the people around you, be conscious of what they need, thus whenever we have visitors we make sure that they get the best treatment, we even offer food which are much different from what we eat at a daily basis. This culture has helped us progress socially and psychologically, knowing that people would always be there to help you and you in return should offer any kind of help to others.

This what makes us easily taught when it comes to accepting different races and cases.

Offline

Board footer