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#51 Monday 14th of November 2016 13:25

actan7
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

HI! Alexia here from the Philippines!

I think the Filipinos have a unique way of celebrating their Sundays. We've really put our own spin on the occupation of going to mass. To people in other countries, Sunday is that last day of the weekend before the dreaded Monday comes in. To some, it's that one day of the week wherein they feel that they are obligated to go to church. To Filipinos however, it has become an event of some sorts. To the average Filipino, their Sunday is most definitely a day of worship. Sunday mass is for sure a staple in their Sundays, maybe it's the first thing they do for the day or maybe it's something they like to do before dinner. Filipinos make time for their Sunday mass and they almost always attend mass at the exact same time that they usually do. It has become a part of their routine. Most Filipino families include family bonding in their Sunday agenda. Sunday is where they squeeze in all the family activities that they can possibly do in one day (usually watching movies, eating dinner, yk the usual strolling around or pamamasyal as we like to call it in Filipino).

For my family, our usual Sunday consists of going to mass at exactly 12pm then eating lunch and dinner at home. The twist here is this is the only night of the week that us kids help out in cooking dinner.

What about you guys? What's your usual Sunday tradition?

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#52 Monday 14th of November 2016 13:50

jbomamos
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi Jalan here from Manila, Philippines!

One of the most accustomed occupations in the Philippines that I am really fascinated is how Filipinos show their respect to elders. They make it a point that everyday, they will mano those who are older than them, whether their parents or any other elderly people. To learn more here's the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYuAz7juAQo

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#53 Monday 14th of November 2016 14:05

Franzes Dizon
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

spvillarama@up.edu.ph wrote:

Filipinos put a high value on cleanliness that taking a bath at least once or twice every day has been such an important part of everyday life. This habit may be attributed to the hot and humid climate in our country and the abundance of water seeing as we are surrounded by large bodies of water. We usually take a bath in the morning before leaving for work and one again in the evening before going to sleep. For some Filipinos who claim to only take a bath once a day, chances are they take what we call a “half bath” which involves cleaning the face, armpits, private parts and feet before sleeping.

http://i65.tinypic.com/5a5rmx.jpgg
                                                                                  The Philippines' famous tabo and timba

Unlike other countries, many Filipino households do not have overhead showers that is why the plastic tabo, pronounced as TAH-boh is an almost indispensable fixture in the Filipino home. Although it is most commonly found in the provinces, it is also widely used in the cities. The tabo and the timba, generally a plastic pail with a metal handle filled with water are the traditional Filipino hygiene tools used to clean the toilet floor, to get water to flush the toilet, and most importantly, to get water for personal cleanliness: for washing hands, for shampooing, and for bathing the whole body.

Also, not all toilets in the Philippines have a flush, so the tabo and the timba are also widely used for anal cleansing. Many Filipinos actually prefer this practice rather than using toilet paper since believe it or not, it will make you feel much cleaner and refreshed than using toilet paper alone. Worry not since Filipinos thoroughly wash their hands after going to the toilet using water and soap.

Click the YouTube link below if you want to learn more about the unique Filipino toilet practice of using tabo and timba.

Filipino CR Tutorial by Mikey Bustos


Hi Sophia!!!

I do agree with you, many have been fond of using dipper when taking a bath since it has been the usual way of getting water from a pail since then. In most cases, people really prioritize taking a bath in the morning before going out, considering that they'd meet a lot of people and it would affect how they present themselves, even when they're running late; they would prefer taking a bath first. First impressions are hard to forget, thus once you meet a person we really seek to it to look on how he/she presents himself/herself to the public and of course nothing beats a fresh feeling all the time.

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#54 Tuesday 15th of November 2016 14:15

sdarguson
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Maria Nicole Sombillo wrote:

Besides the use of "tabo" or pail for bathing and hygiene, use of "harana" or serenade while courting, having jeepneys that are uniquely Filipinos, celebrating fiestas and having "kakanin" or native delicacies, practicing "pagkakamay" or use of hands and fingers for eating, and avoiding criticizing, what are the other occupations or things that we, Filipinos, do differently?

Check this site out: www.livinginthephilippines.com/culture-and-people/philippine-culture/culture-and-traditions/415-filipino-culture-customs-and-traditions

This site presents the Filipino culture and the occupations in great detail, e.g. how and why it was done smile


Hi Nicole!

Im an advocate for bringing back the art of Filipino poetry back to life. Filipino poets, or Makatas, seem to be emerging once again. Along with harana, poetry used to be a way of expressing a person's feelings to others, and through the rising art of performance poetry, Makatas are now popping up and improving their art!
I myself view poetry writing as a very important occupation.

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#55 Tuesday 15th of November 2016 23:41

Sam Agura
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Maria Nicole Sombillo wrote:

Hi Sam! I just wanted to add a link to a song entitled "Harana" by Parokya ni Edgar. You may want to listen to this. This is a widely known song in the Philippines about serenading, and this is sung especially while courting smile https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=T18gvfU2x3Q and an English translation -->
lyricstranslate.com/en/harna-serenade.html

Sam Agura wrote:

Sam here~

One interesting I've seen in our culture that's pretty interesting is the courtship practices we have here in the Philippines. While we are already in the 21st century, most of our traditional courtship practices can still be seen in the rural areas and sometimes even in the big cities. While there are women who are okay with being the one to do the chasing after a guy, it is still preferred that it is the men who do the chasing after women.

One courtship practice that persists in some provinces in the country today is the "harana" or serenade where the man goes to the house of the woman with his friends to sing love songs to her in the hopes that they will be invited to the house and get an opportunity to express his intentions to the girl. Although it is seldom seen nowadays, it is still sometimes indulged in by the more old-fashioned menfolk. Since it is rather rare during these times, it elicits a lot of attention and gets a lot of brownie points for the man.

It is also a common practice to have a "tulay" or bridge, usually a close friend of the girl, whom the man approaches to ask for help in courting her.

It is also preferred by parents to have the men courting their daughters to come over to their house to visit and court, instead of doing it through text messages or going somewhere else. This is to ensure that the parents get to know who are interested in their daughters.

Ohhhh and I noticed someone posted a youtube link so I'll do the same: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WId8qkiEYw


Hi there! Thanks for the song recommendation. I'll be sure to listen to it. Knowing that a song about this tradition has been written shows how much it is still valued and practiced here in our country and I think that it's pretty nice knowing that we still keep some of these traditions even if they may be outdated. It's also nice that in some rare occasions, there are still some guys willing to go through this tradition.

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#56 Tuesday 15th of November 2016 23:51

Sam Agura
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

KawJemilyn wrote:

Hey Sam! This is an interesting topic indeed! I'm gonna share and compare Chinese kind of courting to Filipino culture courtship since I am a Filipino-Chinese.

I remembered my mom told me about how she and my father met. My Filipino-Chinese father is born and raised here in Manila while my mother is a pure Chinese born and raised in China; they have an age gap of 7 wherein my father is older. On their mid-20s, my father followed my grandfather back to their hometown to do some work. With their ages, they are being "haunted" by matchmakers in the town. A matchmaker from my father's neighborhood went to my maternal grandparents' house to make ties. They were introduced to each other for months and finally, everything is settled. My father courted my mom with the old-fashioned way (i.e., asking permissions for dating, bringing gifts of sincerity to the maternal house), married her and brought her back to the Philippines.

Actually, what he did is not really acceptable for my maternal great grandmother until now, she thinks that Chinese must marry Chinese and must stay in China. (traditional way of thinking)When I go visit her in China, she would always remind me to marry a man of the same culture. In college, I just discovered that the term for this traditional way of thinking is 'great wall', resembling to the Great Wall of China which borders the China from invaders of other cultures.

Here in the Philippines, diversity is not a problem since early Filipino times; this is one of the difference between Filipino and Chinese cultures regarding courtship and relationship.

The similarities between Filipino and Chinese courtship are the formality and age. People must get married within the appropriate age gap or they would be judged by the people around them, and it doesn't matter whether how far their age gap were.

I hope that I will not be tied with this traditional culture since as you mentioned, we're already in the 21st century. smile

What do you think?

Jem


Sam Agura wrote:

Sam here~

One interesting I've seen in our culture that's pretty interesting is the courtship practices we have here in the Philippines. While we are already in the 21st century, most of our traditional courtship practices can still be seen in the rural areas and sometimes even in the big cities. While there are women who are okay with being the one to do the chasing after a guy, it is still preferred that it is the men who do the chasing after women.

One courtship practice that persists in some provinces in the country today is the "harana" or serenade where the man goes to the house of the woman with his friends to sing love songs to her in the hopes that they will be invited to the house and get an opportunity to express his intentions to the girl. Although it is seldom seen nowadays, it is still sometimes indulged in by the more old-fashioned menfolk. Since it is rather rare during these times, it elicits a lot of attention and gets a lot of brownie points for the man.

It is also a common practice to have a "tulay" or bridge, usually a close friend of the girl, whom the man approaches to ask for help in courting her.

It is also preferred by parents to have the men courting their daughters to come over to their house to visit and court, instead of doing it through text messages or going somewhere else. This is to ensure that the parents get to know who are interested in their daughters.

Ohhhh and I noticed someone posted a youtube link so I'll do the same: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WId8qkiEYw



Hi Jem!

It's really interesting how different cultures practice courtship and how couples generally end up together in different places. Your story about your parents sound very interesting, seeing how they went through a matchmaker before coming to know each other. While we may be in the 21st century, it is notable that a lot of people still follow traditional courtship practices, even if they may already be outdated. It is also gratifying to know that there are still values from before that people still want to continue practicing. It serves to preserve our culture.

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#57 Saturday 19th of November 2016 03:19

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi guys! I hope I'm not too late to join the conversation! Anyway, I'm here to discuss Philippine society’s perception of the LGBT community. I know that this is a bit controversial considering that some of us may have differing opinions regarding this topic, but I hope that each of us can respect each other's viewpoints. Moving on, in the Philippines, gays are typically portrayed as the effeminate, drag queen characters with highly feminine features. It’s not surprising that when you hear gay, or in Filipino terms, “bakla” (a portmanteau of babae, the Filipino word for girl, and lalaki, the Filipino word for boy), the first thing that comes into mind is the image of a highly feminine man in women’s clothes. As such, gay beauty pageants are common here (or at least from the area that I’m from). In retrospect, lesbians are portrayed as women who assume a masculine appearance and attitude, yet from where I come from, lesbians aren’t as celebrated compared to the gays. Unfortunately, these same stereotypes have plagued what members of the LGBT community can and is capable of doing.
If you’re gay in the Philippines, society dictates that the only jobs that you could take are beauticians, fashion designers, comedians or anything remotely related to promoting a feminine image. Filipinos are so stuck on the preconceived notion of what gays are that they don’t see their potential in other professions, which is sad. Lesbians aren’t as restricted on what society dictates on what they can do, but they aren’t given enough emphasis all the same.
As for the bisexuals, they are often overlooked in favor of their gay and lesbian counterparts. I’m bisexual even though I prefer guys over girls, but that doesn’t mean that I’m totally gay. As a bisexual in the Philippines, it’s difficult to explain what my sexuality is because most people just generalize. Yes, I may be effeminate and I may swoon over the next guy or two, but I still like girls. Unfortunately for some people, bisexuality is an excuse to make you seem socially acceptable as a “straight person”. Sadly, this is the problem with bisexual culture in the Philippines: most people are unaware that we exist! Instead, they tend to blend with the “gay” and “straight” ends of the spectrum.
Transsexuals, on the other hand, are often synonymous with gays in terms of societal perceptions and expectations. In fact, when you’re gay in the Philippines, most people tend to think that you “eventually want to become a girl”, which is sad because there’s a difference between being gay and being transsexual.
That’s all so far! I’m not going to discuss other sensitive topics related to the LGBT community because this post might reach three pages long, but I hope I’ve piqued your interests without offending anyone.

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#58 Saturday 19th of November 2016 07:22

Noel Nicanor
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi! Noel here.
One of the defining factors of being a Filipino is having an extreme devotion in practicing one’s own religion; much so that it can be said that having a religious grounding on Roman Catholicism has greatly affected our culture and at how we engage in daily occupations. An example would be how we always begin with a prayer before doing other meaningful activities. Back in high school and grade school, our days are started by praying during the flag ceremony and every class also begins in prayer. We also pray before we eat, before a program begins, and for some even before they sleep they pray. Prayer is basically a part of every practicing Filipino's life. I also just want to share that with more than 86% of its population being catholic, the Philippines boasts itself as one of the major practitioners of this faith only to be followed by East Timor here in Asia and this makes our country have its own identity.
How about in your respective countries? What are the unique ways in which you engage in an occupation?

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#59 Saturday 19th of November 2016 07:53

Noel Nicanor
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi Gale!
I myself am an avid fan of Fiestas because of how fun and and exciting it is to participate in one. I've went and watched different fiestas and all I could say is that it really brings out a sense of pride in you as a Filipino because you will see the different values that we, as Filipinos, have come to develop. 'Bayanihan', or defined as helping out one’s neighbor as a community and doing a task together, is very observable in these kinds of events. A fiesta is also never complete without the different laborious presentations of the townspeople.

etalas wrote:

But there's more! Fiestas are celebrated as lively as the people can!!! Parades full of efforts are always present. People joining the parades have extraordinary costumes, masks, make-ups, and head-dresses that were prepared couple of months before the fiesta.

Couldn't agree with you more on this one! The costumes really speak for themselves during fiestas because of how intricate and elaborate they are!

etalas wrote:

Celebrating fiestas has its advantages and disadvantages. Any idea? Would you like to suggest any modification?

The few disadvantages that I see in celebrating fiestas is the probable corruption done by those who are facilitating these kinds of events especially how it costly it actually is to have a fiesta. My other concern is general lack of concern for proper waste management. Most onlookers simply throw their trash anywhere resulting to a very messy environment after the event. Fiestas are also danger hotspots for different crimes such as stealing and gambling. That's why it is advisable to always keep watch over your belongings. Imposing strict rules would probably help in making fiestas even more fun, safe, and eco-friendly.

etalas wrote:

Should we still continue it?

Without a doubt, of course! The different fiestas celebrated here helped us identify ourselves as Filipinos, and I think that is very important for every country; to have an identity.

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#60 Saturday 19th of November 2016 08:34

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Noel Nicanor wrote:

Hi! Noel here.One of the defining factors of being a Filipino is having an extreme devotion in practicing one’s own religion; much so that it can be said that having a religious grounding on Roman Catholicism has greatly affected our culture and at how we engage in daily occupations. An example would be how we always begin with a prayer before doing other meaningful activities. Back in high school and grade school, our days are started by praying during the flag ceremony and every class also begins in prayer. We also pray before we eat, before a program begins, and for some even before they sleep they pray. Prayer is basically a part of every practicing Filipino's life. I also just want to share that with more than 86% of its population being catholic, the Philippines boasts itself as one of the major practitioners of this faith only to be followed by East Timor here in Asia and this makes our country have its own identity. How about in your respective countries? What are the unique ways in which you engage in an occupation?



Ayoooo Noel!


(/・0・)


I could totally relate with your claim that Filipinos are generally religious. People often see that Filipinos exhibit these in numerous ways apart from prayer and attending mass. One example could often be seen on the road. Most of us, Roman Catholics, would do the sign of the cross as we pass by churches and parishes.


CLICK HERE


Jeepney drivers would have no second thoughts in doing so, often having rosary beads hanging on their rearview mirrors (along with other religious paraphernalia such as scapulars and images of the Virgin Mary).


CLICK HERE AGAIN


You know how churches often have holy water settled by the entrances? It makes me recall this term our history professor taught us called "ablution," the act we perform when we dip our fingers in holy water, then use it to do the sign of the cross. These are just very few of the religious everyday practices we witness and do.


(  ̄▼ ̄ )


Growing up, I guess having a relatively religious environment has influenced me in more ways than one. I would say that it contributed to maintaining my sanity. Like most people, praying has become an instinct for us not only during tough or happy times, but also as a routine we find peace in. I guess it would be safe to say that I have learned to channel the calmness I gain from prayer to better my performance in daily life. Despite the many controversies religion (especially the Catholic church) holds, I found that we have the choice to choose which issues are to be accepted or to be contested.


(・∀・)


Do people in other countries also have certain oppositions to their religion's practices?


(⊙ o ⊙) ?

Last edited by myungderp kiddo (Saturday 19th of November 2016 10:09)

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#61 Saturday 19th of November 2016 12:11

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

jbomamos wrote:

Hi Jalan here from Manila, Philippines!

One of the most accustomed occupations in the Philippines that I am really fascinated is how Filipinos show their respect to elders. They make it a point that everyday, they will mano those who are older than them, whether their parents or any other elderly people. To learn more here's the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYuAz7juAQo



Ayooo Jalan!

(*^O^)ノ


You are most certainly right with that. Filipinos have this penchant for putting the elderly (and those older than us) on a higher stand. It is automatic for us to be exceptionally respectful to them, even to the point of having a specific set of pronouns to be used (ie. "sila ho?," "ano pong gusto nila?," and etc.).


( ʘ̆ ╭͜ʖ╮ ʘ̆ )


This has been a great quality of us, Filipinos, as it exercises our patience and compassion (not limited to the elderly, but also to those who are older than us even by just a few years). Sometimes, though, it becomes a barricade towards expression. We restrain from confronting our elders despite their skewed points and misconceptions; all this just for the reason that we fear upsetting them.


¯\_( ͠° ͟ʖ °͠ )_/¯


As OTs and future OTs, we are trained how to say things as best as we could without having to be offensive. I guess we could still manifest our respectful attitude while using euphemisms and educated language.


( ͡~ ͜ʖ ͡°)


What do you guys think about this?

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#62 Sunday 20th of November 2016 06:19

GeNaldoza
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

etalas wrote:

Hi guys! In the Philippines, aside from Christmas, New Year, and birthdays, citizens are also celebrating FIESTAS!!! Fiestas are held on the birthday of the patron saint and we have lots of saints here in our country so every town and city has a fiesta of its own. I've just realized that fiestas could fall under the category of birthdays hehe smile Let's continue. Inside the churches, novenas and special prayers are to be spoken. But there's more! Fiestas are celebrated as lively as the people can!!! Parades full of efforts are always present. People joining the parades have extraordinary costumes, masks, make-ups, and head-dresses that were prepared couple of months before the fiesta. Combos (bands during fiestas) have this role of energizing the parade by loud sounds and hard beats. Fiestas are also considered a thanksgiving day that's why at homes, you would expect so much food and visitors from other towns.

Celebrating fiestas has its advantages and disadvantages. Any idea? Would you like to suggest any modification? Should we still continue it?

Hi etalas! For me fiestas are a good way to bring families together. Philippines is a very family-centric country and Fiestas can serve as mini reunions for them and to catch up too! It is also a good bonding experience for the families that prepare the food together and organizing the whole event could be tiring for a one person army hehe smile

The Philippines has a lot of celebrations and festivities to offer and with that, a lot of occupations we can, and our clients can engage in.

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#63 Sunday 20th of November 2016 08:26

GeNaldoza
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

actan7 wrote:

HI! Alexia here from the Philippines!

I think the Filipinos have a unique way of celebrating their Sundays. We've really put our own spin on the occupation of going to mass. To people in other countries, Sunday is that last day of the weekend before the dreaded Monday comes in. To some, it's that one day of the week wherein they feel that they are obligated to go to church. To Filipinos however, it has become an event of some sorts. To the average Filipino, their Sunday is most definitely a day of worship. Sunday mass is for sure a staple in their Sundays, maybe it's the first thing they do for the day or maybe it's something they like to do before dinner. Filipinos make time for their Sunday mass and they almost always attend mass at the exact same time that they usually do. It has become a part of their routine. Most Filipino families include family bonding in their Sunday agenda. Sunday is where they squeeze in all the family activities that they can possibly do in one day (usually watching movies, eating dinner, yk the usual strolling around or pamamasyal as we like to call it in Filipino).

For my family, our usual Sunday consists of going to mass at exactly 12pm then eating lunch and dinner at home. The twist here is this is the only night of the week that us kids help out in cooking dinner.

What about you guys? What's your usual Sunday tradition?

Hi Alexia! I do agree with you on this one, Filipinos love their Sundays! Our Family usually goes to church at 7 am then we head out to lunch with our relatives for a bonding of some sort smile Philippines being one of the religious countries values the occupation of going to church and then hanging out with other family members after. The malls are usually packed with families during the afternoon and even until late in the evening! You have to be fast in lining up for restaurants haha

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#64 Sunday 20th of November 2016 11:59

rfgenuino
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Felix Isaac Tiburcio wrote:

Hi guys! I hope I'm not too late to join the conversation! Anyway, I'm here to discuss Philippine society’s perception of the LGBT community. I know that this is a bit controversial considering that some of us may have differing opinions regarding this topic, but I hope that each of us can respect each other's viewpoints. Moving on, in the Philippines, gays are typically portrayed as the effeminate, drag queen characters with highly feminine features. It’s not surprising that when you hear gay, or in Filipino terms, “bakla” (a portmanteau of babae, the Filipino word for girl, and lalaki, the Filipino word for boy), the first thing that comes into mind is the image of a highly feminine man in women’s clothes. As such, gay beauty pageants are common here (or at least from the area that I’m from). In retrospect, lesbians are portrayed as women who assume a masculine appearance and attitude, yet from where I come from, lesbians aren’t as celebrated compared to the gays. Unfortunately, these same stereotypes have plagued what members of the LGBT community can and is capable of doing.
If you’re gay in the Philippines, society dictates that the only jobs that you could take are beauticians, fashion designers, comedians or anything remotely related to promoting a feminine image. Filipinos are so stuck on the preconceived notion of what gays are that they don’t see their potential in other professions, which is sad. Lesbians aren’t as restricted on what society dictates on what they can do, but they aren’t given enough emphasis all the same.
As for the bisexuals, they are often overlooked in favor of their gay and lesbian counterparts. I’m bisexual even though I prefer guys over girls, but that doesn’t mean that I’m totally gay. As a bisexual in the Philippines, it’s difficult to explain what my sexuality is because most people just generalize. Yes, I may be effeminate and I may swoon over the next guy or two, but I still like girls. Unfortunately for some people, bisexuality is an excuse to make you seem socially acceptable as a “straight person”. Sadly, this is the problem with bisexual culture in the Philippines: most people are unaware that we exist! Instead, they tend to blend with the “gay” and “straight” ends of the spectrum.
Transsexuals, on the other hand, are often synonymous with gays in terms of societal perceptions and expectations. In fact, when you’re gay in the Philippines, most people tend to think that you “eventually want to become a girl”, which is sad because there’s a difference between being gay and being transsexual.
That’s all so far! I’m not going to discuss other sensitive topics related to the LGBT community because this post might reach three pages long, but I hope I’ve piqued your interests without offending anyone.

As someone who is also bisexual, I super agree!! It's annoying to hear people constantly say I don't look like a lesbian or "tibo" at all (even though I'm bisexual haha). And even though gays are "accepted" into society, media continues to perpetuate the negative gay best friend stereotype. LGBT people are merely seen as side characters without much depth or just to add comedic relief (as if them being gay makes them automatically hilarious, sassy, and sarcastic).

However, I think it's nice to see the efforts of people, especially college students, to break these negative stereotypes. I've heard of several LGBT-centered zines being made by art students from places such as Benilde and Ateneo which help inform people about the problems of the community. Independent online artists such as huhsmile or rombutan also create illustrations about LGBT that go viral on Facebook. I've even heard a recent mainstream teleserye features a gay main character who seems to break these stereotypes. Given, the plot is somewhat cliche, it's definitely a step towards the right direction for Filipino people to be more aware.

Last edited by rfgenuino (Sunday 20th of November 2016 12:00)

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#65 Sunday 20th of November 2016 12:08

rfgenuino
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

sagacho wrote:

Hi I'm Sam G from the Philippines!

There are a lot of unique ways on how we do occupations here in the Philippines but I'll share with you one of the most common occupations I do - commuting! Here in the Philippines the most popular means of public transportation is the Jeepney. It is really popular because it has a relatively cheap fare and we have lot of it here.The idea of jeepneys here in the Philippines originally came from the US. There were a lot of military jeepneys left after the World War II and they were sold and given to the local Filipinos. Filipinos then started to modify it such as adding roofs and painting it with vibrant colors and due to its seating design that can accommodate many people the jeepney  became a common public transporting vehicle.


This is a picture of a military jeep during World War II
http://www.tourisminthephilippines.com/ … 2%2001.jpg

This is picture of a typical jeep here in the Philippines today
http://www.filipiknow.net/wp-content/up … ppines.jpg

Commuting is a really important occupation for us Filipinos, especially now that the traffic here is really really heavy and we are discouraged to bring our own private vehicles to go to school or to work. I have to admit that some of our public vehicles are not accessible to persons with disabilities. And this is one  of the many thoughts that I am bothered about when I am commuting. The jeepney is relatively crowded and it has a really low roof and a person with  physical disability can not take this means of transportation and a PWD has no choice but to take another means of transportation. Another famous public transportation we have is our rail transits. Our rail transits have a specific area for PWDs, senior citizens and pregnant women but based on my observation this doesn't make sense. Around hundreds of thousands of riders everyday and also considering the few number of operational trains we have  the rail transits are always congested  and the special area for the PWDs is also jammed you can't even make a space to breathe what more for a wheel chair or crutches. You'll actually feel like a sardine inside the train for a moment.

Commuting is already a part of every Filipino's life and I am looking forward that soon we'll have more accessible and more inclusive transportation for the PWD commuters. As a future Occupational Therapist I would love to handle clients that would like to  commute independently but I know this will be very very hard considering the system of our transportation here. I hope in the near future we can do something about this one step at a time. smile

Any commute stories you want to share guys? smile

I agree with how most of our means of public transportation are quite inefficient. While the jeepney has become quite the symbol for the Philippines and provides several Filipinos with jobs, the entire jeepney system is not only unfriendly to PWDs, but also extremely inefficient, dangerous and harmful to the environment. I hope the government will work towards more efficient bus and train services so that one day we can completely do away with jeepneys because there honestly aren't much pros to jeepneys existing and it honestly just makes much more sense, seeing as other countries have been able to create efficient train/bus systems without the need for jeepneys.

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#66 Sunday 20th of November 2016 15:13

actan7
Member

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

jbomamos wrote:

Hi Jalan here from Manila, Philippines!

One of the most accustomed occupations in the Philippines that I am really fascinated is how Filipinos show their respect to elders. They make it a point that everyday, they will mano those who are older than them, whether their parents or any other elderly people. To learn more here's the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYuAz7juAQo

Very interesting to note that we are one of the few cultures that have different ways of addressing our elders. We have different terms for our grandparents, parents, uncles and aunties and older siblings.

Notice how this kind of practice is more common in Asian cultures than it is for western ones? I think I would like to know why that is. What about other OT students from western countries? Do you have practices similar to this that we aren't aware of? If not, why do you think so? smile

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#67 Sunday 20th of November 2016 18:20

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hello Chewy! Appreciation is a wonderful thing. Thank you!

Maria Nicole Sombillo wrote:

Hello Sophie! How are you? I like this post very much as I extremely agree to you about this. We, Filipinos, value cleanliness. It is in our culture to take a bath atleast once a day. And yes, we are known to make use of a tabo and timba while bathing. I can remember my elementary teacher asking us this question in class: What household item makes the Filipinos distinct, that when you see this, you'll know right away that there is a Filipino living there? Yes, your answer is right: tabo. smile

spvillarama@up.edu.ph wrote:

Filipinos put a high value on cleanliness that taking a bath at least once or twice every day has been such an important part of everyday life. This habit may be attributed to the hot and humid climate in our country and the abundance of water seeing as we are surrounded by large bodies of water. We usually take a bath in the morning before leaving for work and one again in the evening before going to sleep. For some Filipinos who claim to only take a bath once a day, chances are they take what we call a “half bath” which involves cleaning the face, armpits, private parts and feet before sleeping.

http://i65.tinypic.com/5a5rmx.jpgg
                                                                                  The Philippines' famous tabo and timba

Unlike other countries, many Filipino households do not have overhead showers that is why the plastic tabo, pronounced as TAH-boh is an almost indispensable fixture in the Filipino home. Although it is most commonly found in the provinces, it is also widely used in the cities. The tabo and the timba, generally a plastic pail with a metal handle filled with water are the traditional Filipino hygiene tools used to clean the toilet floor, to get water to flush the toilet, and most importantly, to get water for personal cleanliness: for washing hands, for shampooing, and for bathing the whole body.

Also, not all toilets in the Philippines have a flush, so the tabo and the timba are also widely used for anal cleansing. Many Filipinos actually prefer this practice rather than using toilet paper since believe it or not, it will make you feel much cleaner and refreshed than using toilet paper alone. Worry not since Filipinos thoroughly wash their hands after going to the toilet using water and soap.

Click the YouTube link below if you want to learn more about the unique Filipino toilet practice of using tabo and timba.

Filipino CR Tutorial by Mikey Bustos

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#68 Sunday 20th of November 2016 18:29

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Hi Franzes! I couldn't agree more. It is nice to note that here in the Philippines, it doesn’t matter how basic people's living conditions are. Even though we experience water and electricity cuts every now and then, Filipinos just take it in stride. If there is no water, we go and search for alternative water sources like rivers if we happen to live close to one, or in our case, a nearby freshwater well.

Franzes Dizon wrote:
spvillarama@up.edu.ph wrote:

Filipinos put a high value on cleanliness that taking a bath at least once or twice every day has been such an important part of everyday life. This habit may be attributed to the hot and humid climate in our country and the abundance of water seeing as we are surrounded by large bodies of water. We usually take a bath in the morning before leaving for work and one again in the evening before going to sleep. For some Filipinos who claim to only take a bath once a day, chances are they take what we call a “half bath” which involves cleaning the face, armpits, private parts and feet before sleeping.

http://i65.tinypic.com/5a5rmx.jpgg
                                                                                  The Philippines' famous tabo and timba

Unlike other countries, many Filipino households do not have overhead showers that is why the plastic tabo, pronounced as TAH-boh is an almost indispensable fixture in the Filipino home. Although it is most commonly found in the provinces, it is also widely used in the cities. The tabo and the timba, generally a plastic pail with a metal handle filled with water are the traditional Filipino hygiene tools used to clean the toilet floor, to get water to flush the toilet, and most importantly, to get water for personal cleanliness: for washing hands, for shampooing, and for bathing the whole body.

Also, not all toilets in the Philippines have a flush, so the tabo and the timba are also widely used for anal cleansing. Many Filipinos actually prefer this practice rather than using toilet paper since believe it or not, it will make you feel much cleaner and refreshed than using toilet paper alone. Worry not since Filipinos thoroughly wash their hands after going to the toilet using water and soap.

Click the YouTube link below if you want to learn more about the unique Filipino toilet practice of using tabo and timba.

Filipino CR Tutorial by Mikey Bustos


Hi Sophia!!!

I do agree with you, many have been fond of using dipper when taking a bath since it has been the usual way of getting water from a pail since then. In most cases, people really prioritize taking a bath in the morning before going out, considering that they'd meet a lot of people and it would affect how they present themselves, even when they're running late; they would prefer taking a bath first. First impressions are hard to forget, thus once you meet a person we really seek to it to look on how he/she presents himself/herself to the public and of course nothing beats a fresh feeling all the time.

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#69 Sunday 20th of November 2016 18:33

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

Sure thing, Byeul. It's my pleasure to introduce our colleagues to our very unique culture of using tabo and timba .

Byeul wrote:

Hi, Sophia!
The tabo is really one of the unique Filipino household items. More often than not, relatives from abroad ask their relatives from the Philippines to send them one haha. Culture really does play a very significant role on people's daily routines, especially since in our country where hygiene is an utmost priority. Being neat and tidy is essential for us everyday. Thanks for posting a photo so it's easier for our friends from abroad to visualize it!
- Byeul

spvillarama@up.edu.ph wrote:

Filipinos put a high value on cleanliness that taking a bath at least once or twice every day has been such an important part of everyday life. This habit may be attributed to the hot and humid climate in our country and the abundance of water seeing as we are surrounded by large bodies of water. We usually take a bath in the morning before leaving for work and one again in the evening before going to sleep. For some Filipinos who claim to only take a bath once a day, chances are they take what we call a “half bath” which involves cleaning the face, armpits, private parts and feet before sleeping.

http://i65.tinypic.com/5a5rmx.jpgg
                                                                                  The Philippines' famous tabo and timba

Unlike other countries, many Filipino households do not have overhead showers that is why the plastic tabo, pronounced as TAH-boh is an almost indispensable fixture in the Filipino home. Although it is most commonly found in the provinces, it is also widely used in the cities. The tabo and the timba, generally a plastic pail with a metal handle filled with water are the traditional Filipino hygiene tools used to clean the toilet floor, to get water to flush the toilet, and most importantly, to get water for personal cleanliness: for washing hands, for shampooing, and for bathing the whole body.

Also, not all toilets in the Philippines have a flush, so the tabo and the timba are also widely used for anal cleansing. Many Filipinos actually prefer this practice rather than using toilet paper since believe it or not, it will make you feel much cleaner and refreshed than using toilet paper alone. Worry not since Filipinos thoroughly wash their hands after going to the toilet using water and soap.

Click the YouTube link below if you want to learn more about the unique Filipino toilet practice of using tabo and timba.

Filipino CR Tutorial by Mikey Bustos

Last edited by spvillarama@up.edu.ph (Sunday 20th of November 2016 18:33)

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#70 Monday 21st of November 2016 03:47

Re: OT Students Interaction Topic 4: Society's Take on Occupations

etalas wrote:

Hi guys! In the Philippines, aside from Christmas, New Year, and birthdays, citizens are also celebrating FIESTAS!!! Fiestas are held on the birthday of the patron saint and we have lots of saints here in our country so every town and city has a fiesta of its own. I've just realized that fiestas could fall under the category of birthdays hehe smile Let's continue. Inside the churches, novenas and special prayers are to be spoken. But there's more! Fiestas are celebrated as lively as the people can!!! Parades full of efforts are always present. People joining the parades have extraordinary costumes, masks, make-ups, and head-dresses that were prepared couple of months before the fiesta. Combos (bands during fiestas) have this role of energizing the parade by loud sounds and hard beats. Fiestas are also considered a thanksgiving day that's why at homes, you would expect so much food and visitors from other towns.

Celebrating fiestas has its advantages and disadvantages. Any idea? Would you like to suggest any modification? Should we still continue it?

Hi Gale! I believe that Fiestas have its set of advantages and disadvantages. For one thing, it brings people closer together and encourages commaradorie between us Filipinos, but I believe that a major disadvantage of Fiestas is the excessive consumption that favors decadence over serving other people. Because of the loudness of Fiestas, nearby towns and communities might be disturbed. In addition, the amount of food cooked and wasted in Fiestas could have benefitted other people who truly need such necessities. I like Fiestas as much as the next person, but sometimes I question why we have to spend so much for the sake of celebration

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